7 month old Cockrel

Cheyenne97

Songster
May 28, 2018
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Kentucky
I have a Salmon Faverolle rooster, he is almost 8 months old. I’ve posted this before and everyone said to wait a few more months.... we’ll 3 months later and he still doesn’t crow (I supposed that’s a good thing) but he also doesn’t make any chicken noises. I think he may have just noticed the hens and has tried mating with one of them at least. (I noticed my Cochin hen had a dirty back in the areas a rooster would mount). I know that the rooster not making noise isn’t normal. Could he have a damaged voice box? The lady I got him from said he was a very sickly chick and she didn’t think he was going to make it. He’s now huge and healthy.

Here is a picture of him.
 

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oldhenlikesdogs

Great Horny Toads
BYC Staff
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Even with a damaged voice box a rooster would still go through the motions of crowing I think. Crowing is to announce to the world, and any other roosters, that the rooster is here and is claiming the hens and the territory.

Many of my younger roosters don't crow until they are older either. The more hormones and confidence the more they crow. I would bet after the winter solstice under increasing daylight your boy will find his voice. By early spring he should be more eager with surging hormones.
 

sourland

Broody Magician
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
May 3, 2009
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Is there another dominant rooster in the flock ? Presence of a strong rooster can slow the development of a subordinate. My gut instinct is that he is just a slow developing cockerel. The picture shows him to be in excellent feather and condition.
 

Cheyenne97

Songster
May 28, 2018
194
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Kentucky
people in cities would pay you lots of money for non-crowing rooster if it really bothers you :)
I could never get rid of him lol, he is just the sweetest. I actually live in a neighborhood (I have more chickens than what the city says I can have but oh well) and I’m allowed one rooster but no one has a problem with the chickens making noises. It’s funny, we had a strange person walking between our houses and my chickens alerted (hens did) the neighbors and they noticed the man looking in cars.
 

Cheyenne97

Songster
May 28, 2018
194
279
121
Kentucky
Is there another dominant rooster in the flock ? Presence of a strong rooster can slow the development of a subordinate. My gut instinct is that he is just a slow developing cockerel. The picture shows him to be in excellent feather and condition.


There is no other rooster. Just 9 hens.
 

azygous

Enabler
11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
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As @oldhenlikesdogs pointed out, as the days begin getting longer, that will trigger his hormones, and you will likely then hear him making some attempts to crow. You will know his hormones are flowing when you see red streaks going down the backs of his legs.

Also, he may not have an urge to crow unless he hears another rooster crowing. Some roos are only interested in crowing in competition to another one.
 

Mosey2003

Crowing
5 Years
Apr 13, 2016
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Could be a few things. He may just be especially slow to mature, and will take up crowing within a few more months. He may be one that never gets especially masculine and just won't crow much at all. Or if the hens are older than him, he may not feel dominant enough over them yet to really let loose with his male characteristics. If you butcher enough cockerels and roosters, you eventually see that not all of them are endowed the same, you can have very young ones with huge testicles, and full grown ones with rather small ones. If you're not breeding to improve the birds, it really is of no consequence.
 

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