80% RH for final days solved in home made incubator

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Ken H, Jun 22, 2009.

  1. Ken H

    Ken H Songster

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    May 21, 2009
    "Put a sock in it" takes on a whole new meaning. At 99.5 degrees I was having trouble obtaining 80 % RH till I came up with this idea. Used an old sock to dip into the humidifier pan as a wick then put the other end over and around the circulation fan. The results were all I could hope for. Now maintaining an 80% RH for the final few days is a foregone conclusion. I will keep experimenting till the eggs arrive, but I now know that I can obtain optimal conditions. Here's a pic incase my explanation is lacking on how the goal was obtained.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. pips&peeps

    pips&peeps There is no "I" in Ameraucana

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    Why do you want the humidity so high. It seems too high to me, you will drown the chicks in their own fluid.

    60-65 is plenty high.
     
  3. roche477

    roche477 Songster

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    I run 70-75% for mine and 80% for waterfowl. Anything below 70% for me drops my hatch rate way down.
     
  4. Dirt Road

    Dirt Road Songster

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    Nov 9, 2008
    Southern Idaho
    pips&peeps :

    Why do you want the humidity so high. It seems too high to me, you will drown the chicks in their own fluid.

    60-65 is plenty high.

    I agree.

    Also wonder if reducing the air flow by covering the fan might affect temps in some places in the incubator???

    Jim​
     
  5. Ken H

    Ken H Songster

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    May 21, 2009
    The sock over the fan is only for day 19 till hatch. I've read in several articals that 80% is the best RH for that period. Before and after that time frame the sock is not on the fan, just acting as a wick, and RH is around 60%. I have 3 electrinic thermometers in 3 different locations in the incubator. They all read the same temperature. It's not a very big incubator after all. The size for around a dozen eggs. The eggs I have ordered will be my first attempt and I want to avoid any mistakes I can, thus the extensive testing and data gathering. I've been running tests for the past week and making modifications as results are observed. Thanks for all input because, as stated, I am completely new to this.
     
  6. pips&peeps

    pips&peeps There is no "I" in Ameraucana

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    I don't know where you got the info about the humidity, but that is too high.

    I run my humidity between 45-50% the first 18-19 days and then up it to about 60% for the hatch. Heck I even have chicks hatch in the incubator still riding in the racks because I forget to move the eggs to the hatcher. No problems.

    I do know that depending on where you live, it needs to be adjusted for your area. You will have to work at it and see what your specific needs are.
     
  7. walkswithdog

    walkswithdog Crowing

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    Jul 17, 2008
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    I'd be drowning here at 80%. Like pips, I often have them hatching at 45-50% humidity when I've miscalculated days or they were under a broody who stopped and I just don't know when they'll hatch.

    The only two hatches I've ever had that high were in the beginning and only one survived from each of those hatches.

    I figured if they're popping out clean and easily at the place I have it on 1-18, something's right. I've been leaving it alone. Three or more chicks hatching at once bumps it to around 60 and it stays there. It is about what works in your area but I'll never push humidity to extremes again.
     
  8. Paganbird

    Paganbird CrescentWood Farm

    Apr 25, 2009
    Western Pa
    I don't think the humidity is too high... I think humidity is relative. I am currently incubating eggs at 50-60% with no problems at all. I'll bump up to 70%+ for hatch.
    I have "dry" incubated at 35% and bumped up to 45-50% for hatch, too.
    If you have humidity at 35% for 18 days, don't bump it to 80% for the last 3.
    Broodies can hatch eggs in dry Arizona and in muggy Alabama.
    Like I said... I believe humidity is relative.
     

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