9-10 ya big fat hen! Hide and seek?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Our Roost, Apr 28, 2017.

  1. Our Roost

    Our Roost Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How big are your biggest hens and what is there general weight? Going on 6 years of owning birds now for both dual purpose use. We started primarily with 5 breeds of hatchery grown birds and escalated to privately grown breeder quality. It seems each year we experiment with a few new breeds that always look promising in photos but never live up to the hype of how great they are. I guess I keep looking for that big fat hen roaster and only a few birds actually fit that character. I have not owned Cornish x due to all the bad karma surrounding its future as the worlds meat bird. My grand father raised these birds during the depression years before commercially grown and they were good table fare and tasty! I don't want to talk much about roosters here as I have had some monster sized but never any hens that come close. If you have some hens averaging 5/6 lbs. please share what breed you are raising and your secrets!
     
  2. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    There won't be a dual purpose meat bird that comes close to what CorishX is. CornishX is not a breed and had not been developed before the depression so not sure what you were saying there. Before the start of the intensive hybrid meat birds in the 50's and well into that decade the broiler industry was using, Plymouth Rock Cock birds over Hew Hampshire hens to produce broilers. If you wanted a single breed the New Hampshire is a good choice. Keep in mind this breed does not get huge but it does put on weight early. Fast maturing for early slaughter- broiler age. A few people raise Cornish (the breed not the X) with excellent results as a meat bird. Down side of them is they lay few eggs.

    5-6 lbs I'm assuming you mean dress weight. There are a few breeds if of good breeder stock will make close to 5 lbs dressed for roaster age. It seems you are not breeding and just want a dual purpose that lays and will be large for table. One that you can cull a bunch of cockerels are broiler age and not sure why anyone would cull roaster age pullets. Hens that are butchered are usually older and stew birds.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2017
  3. TheTwoRoos

    TheTwoRoos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My New Hampshires always have weighed alot.They are a dual purpose bird ao good for just about anything.
     
  4. Our Roost

    Our Roost Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So that I am not the egghead here, let me clarify. I said my grandfather raised these birds before they were commercialized. White Cornish breed is what they raised and not Cornish x. Sorry I didn't clarify the time period Cornish x came into play. Previous to the Cornish x. In Europe before the end of world war 2, the Malines breed was a dual purpose breed widely raised and consumed. They can and do reach 5-6 lbs. dressed weight. "Roaster" was a bad choice of word to insert as there are many terms used for specific description. Grandma fried most of her chickens and I end up roasting a good portion of ours or crock pot, or use for soup stock. Sometimes I bake in oven after lightly breading and browning. No stewing as yet. Just this older mans EGO.
    Let me clarify, there are many types of breeders. I breed for utility. I enjoy crossbreeding. Most all of what we raise is for both meat and eggs. Many fine birds have developed using this process, correct? I do not practice professional breeding using heritage breeds nor do I show my birds. In truth Egghead, I have raised some very nice sized birds by crossbreeding and am still working on that process to repeat. It is a 5 to 6 year project using 3 breeds. So - please share what you are breeding and "if" you have developed any big fat hens, please share your secrets!
     

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