a converstion with a show breeder.

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by minister man, Nov 12, 2011.

  1. minister man

    minister man Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was talking with a APA judge and show man about setting up a bantam breeding barn, and what he does for his lines.


    For one breed and one colour, he would keep 12-16 females. And 3-4 males per year.

    He said to build 4 single cages that are 3x4x 30"

    He adds 4 pullets per year, and they are in the 4 single cages. He numbers the cages, 1,2,,3, 4. the pullet in 1 and 2 share a male and 3-4 share a male, the Males are moved every couple days from one cage to the other.

    He single mates the pullets to be sure that they produce well before they are kept over.

    The older birds that passed the test as pullets, are mated in trios. He trys to replace 4 pullets per year. He gives no regard to relationship but simply looks for a bird that is really strong where the other is weak. Or if they are both exceptionaly good in one point where the line is weak, he mates those together to strenghten that characteristic in the line.


    They way he goes about things, doesn't really require alot of housing, but Just wondering if the rest of the show people out there think something like that would be reasonable? What do you thinK?
     
  2. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    There is no RIGHT way or WRONG way to pen your birds for breeding. You do what best works for you based on the birds, space and $ you have to work with. No two people do everything exactly the same way--they do what works best for them.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2011
  3. robin416

    robin416 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 6, 2007
    Wait, he switches the two males between the two different cages of females? So that male 1 covering the females in pens 1 & 2 to is moved the following week in to pen 3 & 4 and that male 2 is moved in to the pens 1 & 2? If that's what he's doing studies have shown that the sperm of the dominate male kills off the sperm of the non dominate. Considering hens can remain fertile for several weeks after breeding I don't see how he would be mixing up the gene pool.

    For the rest of it, what Sonoran said. Its what works for you. Trying to build so that you are not always bending to tend to small things or for cleaning is a consideration. My birds live like birds. They have outside pens which means dirty feet and some broken feathers but that's my preference and what works for me. It means minimal bending at clean out since I can use a shovel. Mine are not on wire for several reasons. The biggest would be cold winters and the wire getting cold and cold air being able to come up under it.
     
  4. minister man

    minister man Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No, the male for 1 and 2 is only used on one and two, but one at a time. he just moves him, from 1 to 2 and back to 1.

    He said that his cages are built 4 cages long, and the male is in 1, and 3, and then 2 and 4 so that they are never in ajoining cages so they will fight. So if people do what works for them, how in the world am I suppose to know what will work for me?

    The thing that gets me about his plan is the part were he gives no regard to the relationship between mates. Will that not destroy the line faster than ig he kept track of realtionship?
     
  5. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Quote:Most poultry breeders are not super concerned about inbreeding. They bring in new stock occasionally.

    Really, try what SOUNDS like it will work best for you, then modify as you see fit. There is absolutely NO WAY that anyone can tell you what will work best for you. Only you know how much space you have, how many birds you will have, how many varieties you will have, etc. My suggestion would be to start small with the intention to add later as you find out what works best for you.

    Things to consider--your climate and whether you will have your birds indoors (such as in a barn/garage) or outdoors. How many different breeds and varieties you plan to acquire, the amount of time you have available to devote to their care, the amount of $ you are willing to spend on their facilities, their acqusition, feed and health care, supplies, etc. How far is their coop/pens from your house? It's pretty miserable to head out a quarter of a mile in sub-freezing (or 110+) weather to feed and water multiple birds that are spread far apart. By the same token, you may want to use existing shade for summertime locations. Liek we've said, there is no single answer. Not one of my coops is identical to the others, some things I repeat, others I try new ideas, or go back to older ones. None of my coops would work well in an area with weather that gets extremely cold, but coops that work for those areas would likely bake my birds in our summers.
     
  6. Debbi

    Debbi Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:I fell for the "several weeks" thing my first year; hogwash! If you want to clear a pullet/hen of the previous male, give them at least 6 weeks! Yes, I do believe it would work fine the way he told you, but with winter coming on, like Robin said, the cages could be detremental to the birds, unless they are in a heated or well insulated environment. JMO
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2011
  7. minister man

    minister man Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am thinking that the cages would still be soild floors, so that they could be on shavings/ sawdust. Because I am Only working with one variety and it is white, then at least the grow out pens would be inside. I only plan to show pullets and cockerals. I am still working on the design of the building. That is the reason for the question. Because of that thing we call winter, I don't want to have to build larger than I need to, however, I know that it is more expensive to build too small and wish it was bigger!
     
  8. Debbi

    Debbi Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:

    In that case, you'd be better off to build an insulated barn; seriously! [​IMG]
     
  9. Majestic Lane Poultry

    Majestic Lane Poultry Heart Strings Animal Rehoming

    Feb 9, 2009
    What state do you live in?
     
  10. minister man

    minister man Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't live in a state. Unless you count a state of disorganization. I live in New Brunswick Canada.
     

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