A couple of questions, Google has not helped me!

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by jennifer0224, Nov 30, 2016.

  1. jennifer0224

    jennifer0224 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi, I am in a suburban neighborhood that allows up to 10 "poultry or rabbits". Our lot is only about 9k sf and the neighbors are close. Currently I have 9 (chicken) hens. They are not super quiet but no one seems bothered. However, we would really love to raise a turkey next year for our Thanksgiving meal. My question is about noise. Are they quieter / louder than chicken hens? Is a Tom's gobbling loud / obnoxious? Or would we be better off with two turkey hens? I assume hens are smaller and so one bird would not be quite the Thanksgiving feast as a male..?

    Thanks so much. And would they live well with my chickens? We have many, many wild turkeys around my neighborhood. I never hear them, but then they are not in my backyard! Would love to provide my family with a turkey at Thanksgiving that we know was respected and treated well.
     
  2. deserthotwings

    deserthotwings Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Turkeys do get along well with chickens and most other fowl. Toms can be quite loud during mating season (early spring) and at times when they are disturbed by unusual sights and noises. Both hens and toms probably would be quite a bit nosier than your chicken hens. I don't think I would recommend either turkey hens or toms if you are concerned about noise. Great birds though and a lot of fun to raise. Good Luck with your decision.
     
  3. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    My turkeys harass and chase chickens, and I've had them kill them too, I don't recommend keeping them together. Broad breasted varieties might not be as obnoxious, but are probably just as loud. Turkeys are loud, hens are loud and toms are loud.
     
  4. jennifer0224

    jennifer0224 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    :( It sounds like turkey raising may not be for my family then :( Which is too bad, because since Thanksgiving I've had this vision in my head of a big beautiful turkey strutting around my yard. Boohoo :( Thank you for the advice!
     
  5. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Muscovy ducks are great meat birds, and are quiet. They are 'quack-less'. Not quite the same as turkey, but still better than buying conventionally raised meat. And they are very pretty, interesting birds to have around.
     
  6. jennifer0224

    jennifer0224 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Are muscovy ducks "messy"? This is the biggest argument I have seen against them. We have a swimming pool, so letting them roam free in the yard probably would not be an option right?
     
  7. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    If you let them roam, you have to clip their wings so they don't fly off. They are more terrestrial than mallard-derived ducks, so a swimming area is not required for them. They poop a lot, but that's about it for mess. Males get very large, about 15 pounds. And dress out to about 10 to 12 pounds, that's about the size of a small turkey.
     
  8. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    Muscovy can fly quite well. They are pretty messy in my opinion especially in confinement. They will climb in water containers year round to take baths and their poop is very watery. They can be a bit aggressive when they become broody. Drakes will fight if you keep more than one and they can reproduce in a pretty rapid manner, having large clutches multiple times a year. They are pretty quiet birds but they like to roam and forage. In many southern states they are considered an invasive species and almost got outlawed a few years ago by the DNR.
     

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