A Couple Questions About Mites

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by drdoolittle, Aug 18, 2011.

  1. drdoolittle

    drdoolittle Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 30, 2010
    NE Indiana
    I know there are a LOT of posts about mites, but I didn't have time to read through all of them to find answers to my questions.

    Here goes: 1) Are mites that are on the chcikens' bodies the same as scaly leg mites?
    2) Is it o.k. to eat the eggs of chickens you have dusted with poultry dust? (I also sprinkled a bit in the nest boxes.)
    3) Will it hurt chicks that are soon to hatch if you have dusted the broody hens?
     
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Feb 2, 2009
    Northwest Arkansas
    1) Are mites that are on the chcikens' bodies the same as scaly leg mites?

    No. There are several different kinds of mites. They are sometimes called different names, but the most common are the fowl mites, roost mites, and scaly leg mites. They are different from each other and require different treatments to get rid of them, depending on what kind there are. The way you can tell the difference between fowl mites and roost mites is that the fowl mites are on the chickens day and night, while the roost mites are on the chickens only during dark. They hide in cracks and crevices in the wood or in the bedding during the day. Then you have lice, which again are different.

    2) Is it o.k. to eat the eggs of chickens you have dusted with poultry dust? (I also sprinkled a bit in the nest boxes.)

    Of course, it depends on which "poultry dust" you used. Different ones have different requirements. It depends on the active ingredients.

    I asked a University of Arkansas professor that teaches poultry disease classes about using eggs after dusting the chickens and nests with Sevin, which has an active ingredient Carbaryl. He said the eggs are safe to eat, even of you dusted the nest. This does not apply to any other products, just the 5% Carbaryl in Sevin. I'd think some other active ingredients would be very safe and some might cause a problem.

    3) Will it hurt chicks that are soon to hatch if you have dusted the broody hens?

    If it is made to be used on hens to kill mites and lice, it will not harm the chicks. Now that means you used it according to directions. If you pour it on so you have a thick layer of the dust, that can cause a problem. But if all you did was dust the hen (she will get rid of the excess when she dust bathes or fluffs and shakes) and sprinkle a bit in the nest boxes, you are fine. If you have an active infestation of mites, the mites are a real risk to the broody hen and the chicks. That same professor said that more broody hens are killed by roost mites than any other cause. It is better to treat the mites than to be scared of the powder, but use it according to the directions and use common sense.

    Some additional things. Dusting will not stop scaly leg mites. You need to keep petroleum jelly, mineral oil, or something on the legs for about two weeks to get rid of them.

    If you have roost mites or fowl mites or lice for that matter, you need to treat again in 7 to 10 days. The dust will not kill the eggs. You need to retreat to get the ones that hatch out.

    For the roost mites especially you need to change out the bedding and treat the entire coop. A spray is better than a powder because you need to get it into any cracks in the wood. That's where they hang out during the day. For the fowl mites and lice, the powder works well.

    Hope this helps some. You do need to know what your specific problem is so you can treat it with the right stuff and in the right way. Not all miters are the same and not all products are the same. When it comes to poisons, I like to get pretty specific and not rely on generalities.

    Good luck!
     
  3. StupidBird

    StupidBird Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 8, 2009
    GA
    Thanks from me, too. I have a rampaging problem...these old eyes can't see what bug it is. New birds in quarantine had 'em, major feather loss and red skin. Dusted regularly with the pyrethr...? something poultry dust, and it seemed to clear up. Then I got a bit under the weather for a few weeks, and Wham! Feather loss all over again, red skin, and it has spread to the regular flock.

    Tomorrow, Sevin dust! I might have a less hypersensitive family member do the dusting if available, though. If there's a side effect, I get 'em.
     
  4. drdoolittle

    drdoolittle Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 30, 2010
    NE Indiana
    I believe mine were fowl mites. I dusted everything, and will probably do it again this weekend.
     
  5. StupidBird

    StupidBird Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 8, 2009
    GA
    Ok. Now what?

    Every week I have dusted the birds, boxes, bedding and bath areas with liberal amounts of 5% Sevin. Since the little stinkers intergrated themselves into the main flock (long story, flock roo also helped) I dusted everything.

    Two of the Fuglies (they're called the Fugly Sisters) are growing back feathers. Two are not, and the skin of their back and the front of their thighs still is nekkid and red.

    Are they Pecking themselves? Do I need to use something else? No other birds seem to have problems. Are they just never going to grow feathers back? I am ashamed at their ugliness.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2011
  6. 6chickens in St. Charles

    6chickens in St. Charles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    St. Charles, IL
    Quote:Love your quote "Science fiction: because when I want a little escape from reality, I like to get away as far as possible." So, this is why I watch sasquatch and Ancient Aliens after a run of 16 hour shifts? Must vegg out, far far away out............

    About mites, we've replaced most of our wood with plastic in the coop. Scientifically checked the little buggers unable to grip the tupperware using a jeweler's magnifying glass. In our neighborhood, mites reign. At the very least, we don't promote them where the chickens roost at night. Also, we use permethrin dust in their favorite dusting holes in the garden. Ash from the firepit goes there, too.
     
  7. 6chickens in St. Charles

    6chickens in St. Charles Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,533
    12
    181
    Mar 25, 2009
    St. Charles, IL
    Quote:Love your quote "Science fiction: because when I want a little escape from reality, I like to get away as far as possible." So, this is why I watch sasquatch and Ancient Aliens after a run of 16 hour shifts? Must vegg out, far far away out............

    About mites, we've replaced most of our wood with plastic in the coop. Scientifically checked the little buggers unable to grip the tupperware using a jeweler's magnifying glass. In our neighborhood, mites reign. At the very least, we don't promote them where the chickens roost at night. Also, we use permethrin dust in their favorite dusting holes in the garden. Ash from the firepit goes there, too.
     
  8. colebarnhart

    colebarnhart Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sasquatch is real and Ancient Aliens is one of the best shows on TV!!!!!
     
  9. TEXASSCENT

    TEXASSCENT Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 10, 2011
    Where Do I Find Diatamaceous Earth?
     
  10. BlackBart

    BlackBart Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 29, 2009
    I tried DE didn't work.
    The Vet told me to use Konk twice a year, each treatment lasts about 6 months and it is much cheaper than solutions that are taken internally.
    I short spray under each wing, one spray above the vent and one on the back between the wings, no more mite problems.
    I also spray the nest boxes and roosts with it too.
     

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