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a few of my chickens have 1 eye crusted shut!!what is it. please help!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by LCwilson, Dec 6, 2009.

  1. LCwilson

    LCwilson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 15, 2009
    southeastern ohio
    theres not really much else to say. ive went out in the coop in the mornings and some of my flock has either white foam in their eye or 1 is crusted shut. and i say '''eye''' because its never both of them. just one. what is this. i have no idea how to explain it other than that.
    please help.
    cole.
     
  2. CityClucks

    CityClucks The Center of a 50 Mile Radius

    Jan 31, 2009
    Tulsa, OK
    Cole - this may be coryza - it's a highly contagious disease. First, separate the crusty-eyed birds from the others. Then start here for some ideas of how to treat:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=216363

    Also - use the BYC Search bar up there on the right - type in "eye crusted shut" or "coryza" for more information.

    Good luck!
     
  3. LCwilson

    LCwilson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 15, 2009
    southeastern ohio
    thank you so much. i need to catch it before it spreads to everyone. thanks again. cole.
     
  4. chickenzoo

    chickenzoo Emu Hugger

    Here are some other illnesses that seem to be popping up more and more.........

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum


    Synonyms: MG, chronic respiratory disease (CRD), infectious sinusitis, mycoplasmosis

    Species affected: chickens, turkeys, pigeons, ducks, peafowl and passerine birds.

    Clinical signs: Clinical symptoms vary slightly between species. Infected adult chickens may show no outward signs if infection is uncomplicated. However, sticky, serous exudate from nostrils, foamy exudate in eyes, and swollen sinuses can occur, especially in broilers. The air sacs may become infected. Infected birds can develop respiratory rales and sneeze. Affected birds are often stunted and unthrifty (see Table 1 <http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044#TABLE_1> ).

    There are two forms of this disease in the turkey. With the "upper form" the birds have watery eyes and nostrils, the infraorbitals (just below the eye) become swollen, and the exudate becomes caseous and firm. The birds have respiratory rales and show unthriftiness.

    With the "lower form", infected turkeys develop airsacculitis. As with chickens, birds can show no outward signs if the infection is uncomplicated. Thus, the condition may go unnoticed until the birds are slaughtered and the typical legions are seen. Birds with airsacculitis are condemned.

    MG in chicken embryos can cause dwarfing, airsacculitis, and death.

    Transmission: MG can be spread to offspring through the egg. Most commercial breeding flocks, however, are MG-free. Introduction of infected replacement birds can introduce the disease to MG-negative flocks. MG can also be spread by using MG-contaminated equipment.

    Treatment : Outbreaks of MG can be controlled with the use of antibiotics. Erythromycin, tylosin, spectinomycin, and lincomycin all exhibit anti-mycoplasma activity and have given good results. Administration of most of these antibiotics can be by feed, water or injection. These are effective in reducing clinical disease. However, birds remain carriers for life.

    Prevention: Eradication is the best control of mycoplasma disease. The National Poultry Improvement Plan monitors all participating chicken and turkey breeder flocks.


    Mycoplasma synoviae


    Synonyms: MS, infectious synovitis, synovitis, silent air sac

    Species affected: chickens and turkeys.

    Clinical signs: Birds infected with the synovitis form show lameness, followed by lethargy, reluctance to move, swollen joints, stilted gait, loss of weight, and formation of breast blisters. Birds infected with the respiratory form exhibit respiratory distress. Greenish diarrhea is common in dying birds (see Table 1 <http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044#TABLE_1> ). Clinically, the disease in indistinguishable from MG.

    Transmission: MS is transmitted from infected breeder to progeny via the egg. Within a flock, MS is spread by direct contact with infected birds as well as through airborne particles over short distances.

    Treatment: Recovery is slow for both respiratory and synovitis forms. Several antibiotics are variably effective. The most effective are tylosin, erthromycin, spectinomycin, lincomycin, and chlorotectracycline. These antibiotics can be given by injection while some can be administered in the feed or drinking water. These treatments are most effective when the antibiotics are injected.
     
  5. LCwilson

    LCwilson Chillin' With My Peeps

    276
    0
    119
    Oct 15, 2009
    southeastern ohio
    thank you.
     

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