A&M eggs... late hatch

Discussion in 'Quail' started by James the Bald, Mar 12, 2013.

  1. James the Bald

    James the Bald Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,022
    113
    186
    Jan 6, 2013
    I fear that something has gone terribly wrong. I should have seen some type of movement by now, but there are no signs similar to what everyone else has reported with their eggs. I have three, well, actually 4 thermometers, and not one of them match, so that may be my first problem. The built in thermometer has read 92 degrees when the thermometer that came with the incubator read 99 degrees. The built in hydrometer read 40%, and had a tag near it that says for reference only. I knew I needed a hydrometer, so I went out and purchased 2 more thermometers; one was a digital type with a hydrometer, and the other thermometer was the glass with liquid. When all 3 were placed into the incubator several days prior to getting my eggs, the readings were 99, 98, and 97 degrees. The digital thermometer reads 99, and the one that came along with the incubator was reading 98.
    Here is my timeline: My eggs went into the incubator on 22 February, and the automatic egg turner was fully operational. The temperature and humidity were worked up to 99 degrees and 50% humidity from the moment the hatchery called to notify me that my eggs were shipped. If I needed to add water, I had the Mrs. assist with lifting the egg turner so I could add water, so I spent as little time as possible with the incubator opened (adding water took no longer than 15 seconds). Lockdown was on the 7th of March. That evening, we candled and determined that of the 18 eggs, 13 were viable. The egg turner was completely removed, and each egg was taken from the egg turner, candled, and then placed into the incubator on a paper towel. There was one egg that my daughter had noticed was cracked and had paper stuck to it when we placed the eggs into the incubator. Sure enough, that one appeared to be viable. By my calculations, I should have atleast seen some movement sometime late last night, with a few pips this morning.
     
  2. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend Staff Member

    32,232
    5,586
    601
    Mar 21, 2011
    New Mexico, USA
    My Coop
    So you are not seeing any wiggling of the eggs this morning?

    Judging from the readings on the thermometers, there was probably a temp issue. And it is possible that they are late in developing. However you should be seeing some movement from inside the eggs within the next day or two should they be late.

    What was your lock down humidity? If you incubated at 50%, then at lock down the humidity should have been up around 60% to prevent the chicks from sticking and dehydrating inside the egg.

    Were your vents completely wide open at lock down?

    It sounds like the embryo's made it to lock down. What exactly did you see on March 7th while candling? If you had 13 eggs that appeared to be fully developed, and now none of them are rocking and rolling or piping, and there were no major issues with the incubator, then it was either a low temp resulting in late development, or vent issues and not enough oxygen available for the chicks to pip (babies need a ton of oxygen by lock down and to pip) or your humidity was too low and the chicks are sticking to the shell and can not get out, or they dehydrated and died.

    I would give them another day or so. I would also purchase 2 accurate thermometers from a poultry supply house along with a good hydrometer. It is well worth the investment and to know you are doing all you can do during incubation.

    Keep us posted. I hope they start hatching soon.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2013
  3. James the Bald

    James the Bald Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,022
    113
    186
    Jan 6, 2013
    TwoCrows, No movement. My daughter swears she saw 1 egg move a little 2 days ago. Both of the vents were wide open and the humitity at lockdown was initially 67% and was just above 62% last night. I also made sure nothing was blocking the vents from the inside. For future hatches, should this hatch just be a "late one", I'll be placing an order with Flemings this evening to correct the thermometer / hydrometer issue.

    My daughter has been saying that she believes that they are just being "lazy", and I am hoping that she's right. I'm giving them 48 hours, then I'll be "float testing" them (there is plenty of discussion on that right now, so I better start reading).
    James
     
  4. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend Staff Member

    32,232
    5,586
    601
    Mar 21, 2011
    New Mexico, USA
    My Coop
    James, it is possible that they will be a late hatch, if your temps were a bit low. So should they start hatching within the next day or so, this is obviously your issue. Lower temps cause the chicks to grow slower. Texas A&M's take 17 to 19 days and you are still on day 19.

    Where did you get these eggs? Were they shipped? Shipping can be very hard on eggs as well. However if you did see them well developed at lock down day, then I would say it has nothing to do with shipped eggs. (I am thinking out loud here. LOL)

    If this hatch becomes a total loss, I would suggest opening the eggs, (in a couple of days) and see what was going on inside the eggs. If these made it all the way full term and did not hatch, then it is either a humidity issue or a vent issue. If the embryo's are only slightly or half developed, then it was most likely a temp issue and they grow as far as they could and chilled.

    Yes, I would definitely get yourself a good thermometer and hydrometer. You will most definitely get a better hatch next time. Keeping my fingers crossed that they are only a late hatch or as your daughter says, "being lazy". [​IMG]
     
  5. AngieO

    AngieO Chillin' With My Peeps

    I had some button quail and jumbo quail hatch 5 days after they were supposed to. Leave them be for a couple more days and give them a chance :) The lower temp probably slowed them down.
     
  6. tlstal

    tlstal Out Of The Brooder

    33
    2
    24
    Mar 4, 2013
    check all thermometers get a glass of ice water use the thermometer to stir the water do this for 3-5 min if it is calabrated right it should read 32F if not simply use math to get actual temp

    Tim
     
  7. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend Staff Member

    32,232
    5,586
    601
    Mar 21, 2011
    New Mexico, USA
    My Coop
    This method does not assure accuracy at higher temps.

    Edit to add: You would have to also calibrate them at the boiling point as well to insure complete accuracy at all temps.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2013
  8. tlstal

    tlstal Out Of The Brooder

    33
    2
    24
    Mar 4, 2013
    yes but if you use the boiling method then you have to know your atmosperic pressure AKA sea level different pressures require different temps for water to boil. how ever if you use the ice bath method atmospheric pressure is not needed
     
  9. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend Staff Member

    32,232
    5,586
    601
    Mar 21, 2011
    New Mexico, USA
    My Coop
    It is a lot easier to purchase a good quality thermometer from a reliable source that deals with brooding supplies. Then you know you have accurate temps. :)
     
  10. tlstal

    tlstal Out Of The Brooder

    33
    2
    24
    Mar 4, 2013
    yes it is. Just trying to help James use the thermometers he has already purchased
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by