A propensity for sour crop?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by RM44, Sep 21, 2010.

  1. RM44

    RM44 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 15, 2009
    Woodstock, Georgia
    Do you think a chicken can have a propensity for sour crop? I ask because, out of my flock of 11, one chicken has had it twice now, while none of the others has had it at all. My black australorp named "Mother Plucker" (she had a feather plucking issue when she was a chick and reigned feather-plucking terror on the rest of the flock for several weeks) got sour crop a few months ago, and we thought it was because we were dumping lawn clippings into the run for them. We no longer give them anything like that, and they are fed almost exclusively layer pellets, BOSS and scratch (as a treat) and the occasional table scraps. Yet Mother Plucker has come down with the sour crop again. I'm thinking she might be the first to meet the dinner table. Should I give up hope that she will be a productive hen and cut my losses, or is this just a bad few months for Mother?
     
  2. RM44

    RM44 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 15, 2009
    Woodstock, Georgia
    Anybody???
     
  3. roosters4sale

    roosters4sale Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 12, 2010
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    Hi. I hope shes ok... you can give her some antacid like half of a ground up tums, but, this is just the temporary fix.
     
  4. valsey

    valsey Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 5, 2010
    Two of my hens seemed to always be battling sour crop. One passed, the other is still going. Spoke with a vet today and he said to give her copper sulfate dissolved in water. Don't know how much tho. Also have found colloidal silver to help...as well as baytril. GSE also helps. It's a fungal infection.

    So I guess I would agree that some do have a propensity. Maybe if they get it once they are prone to it.
     
  5. Quillgirl

    Quillgirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 2, 2009
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    Australorps seem to be prone to it for some reason. I have one that has had crop problems over and over. In May, found that the problem was a very large impaction (golf ball sized wad of stuff.) We did surgery and removed it, but her crop never seemed to regain tone. Because it was stretched out, she continuously overfilled it so that it became enlarged. Her problem really was crop stasis- or slow crop- at that point. I found that it was not usually a yeast infection, but bacteria that took up residence when it went sour. At first sign of enlargement, I would separate her and stop feeding her for a day or so. Her crop would begin to deflate as the slow crop drained. In worst cases, a round of antibiotics did the trick. Obviously this became tiresome. So, I decided to put her in a crop bra to see if that would help "bind" her crop and keep it from becoming enlarged, and support it so that it drained more normally. I am thrilled to say that it has done the trick! She doesn't love it, but it has worked for 3 weeks and I think will continue to do so. I may try removing it in a month or so to see if the crop has regained enough tone to keep from engorging.

    Here's how I made the crop bra: I took one of hubby's stretchy black support socks (knee high ones) and cut off the foot. I then cut the resulting tube up the middle and spread it out into a rectangle. I measured my hen around her abdomen behind her wings. Using that measurement plus 3 inches for overlap, I cut one of my son's old baseball uniform belts to measure. (I first removed the buckle and leather tongue end) I then machine stitched the elastic belt to the widest end of the sock rectangle. I stitched velcro on the ends of the elastic so that it could be closed under her wings. At the other sock-end I cut a "U" shaped piece out to form straps that could be safety-pinned behind her neck. (Think of this whole design as an apron without the skirt: just a belt and the adjustable ties at neck.) I make sure the velcro belt isn't so tight that she can't breath. I can fit a finger under it. What works here is the support sock that fits over her breast and keeps it bound tighter, mimicking what her muscles should be doing. It really has worked for my hen amazingly well. Just took about 1 hour of work piecing it, and she has now begun laying again.
     
  6. valsey

    valsey Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 5, 2010
    Quote:That is so inventive! Very nice
     
  7. valsey

    valsey Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 5, 2010
    Ever tried copper sulfate?
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2010
  8. valsey

    valsey Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 5, 2010
    Quillgirl
    Where in Atlanta are you? I'm just 18 miles southeast in Stockbridge
     
  9. HaulnFetch

    HaulnFetch Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 18, 2009
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    We have a Speckled sussex just like that. Curing was not such as problem but, its recurrence was getting old. Our vet prescribed Reglan syrup (Metoclopramide). Its used to improve motility in the digestive tract. We give an eye droppers full twice a day. It's not terribly expensive. We've had no problems since we started that a couple of months ago. She is a sweetheart and a good layer.
     

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