A question on foundation stock for experienced breeders

Discussion in 'Exhibition, Genetics, & Breeding to the SOP' started by The Kibble Goddess, Jan 23, 2015.

  1. The Kibble Goddess

    The Kibble Goddess Chillin' With My Peeps

    178
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    May 24, 2009
    Sylvania, Ga

    I am trying to establish a sustainable flock of Buff Orpingtons for meat and eggs. Last spring i obtained 30 chicks, straight run, from a local private hatcher, the only one i could find within an hour of my farm. He had several roos and about 25 hens in the same pen, so I don't know how related these chicks were. I now don't believe he ever grew out his birds as several have a dark feather in their tails, one has white flight feathers, and one of the hens even has a bit of feathering on her feet (she will not be bred). But they are great egg-a-day layers of good size and the roosters are good to their ladies.

    My flock consists of 2 roos and 12 pullets from this original flock plus one additional rooster that may or may not be part of the parent flock from which my chickens came.

    Only this fall did I realize that I did not know enough about breeding a sustainable flock. I have done some serious reading and have decided to follow the clan mating system as outlined here: http://www.themodernhomestead.us/article/Clan+Mating.html. However, one of my three roosters has a fault, a wry tail, which I didn't know was a fault when chose him. There are not any more Buff Orpington roos available anywhere near me or I would cull him. I am not breeding for show, but would like to breed the best quality I can. Is it any harder to breed wry tail out of a flock than it is to breed out dark or white feathers? At almost 60 years old, I'd hate to set my project back even one year while waiting on the perfect foundation stock.
     
  2. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    There are faults that would prevent me from using a bird as a breeder. Any cockerel (not a "roo") that has a wry tail is not something I would use.

    Here's the thing about being impatient. I mean this quite sincerely. Starting with great foundation stock is so much better than trying to start with really shaky foundations. It will take years and years of breeding weak, hatchery source, hatchery re-bred stock to be birds that well represent the standard for the breed. There is no reason to do this.

    Since you live in GA, you should be do a couple of things.

    First, get yourself down to the Newnan GA show coming up next month. You'll see great birds that will open your eyes and allow you to better judge your own fowl. There are breeders of awesome Orpingtons in your area. There's no reason at all to settle and reproduce birds of lesser quality. http://www.cvpa-newnan.org/show.html Second, join the CVPA and meet wonderful folks who are breeding high quality birds. This is your beginning gateway. There is also some national Orpington clubs as well. Most of whom will have a "social networking page" on that rather famous site.

    There are plenty of Orpington cockerels or cockbirds available to you in your area.

    If you get in contact with breeders before the Newnan show, they'll bring you a male or two. You can meet at Newnan and have a great day of both meeting folks, seeing great birds and picking up some superior stock to take home.

    Best of luck to you on your new adventure.
     
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  3. The Kibble Goddess

    The Kibble Goddess Chillin' With My Peeps

    178
    7
    129
    May 24, 2009
    Sylvania, Ga
    Thank you. Will try to get to the show. Did not see any BO breeders listed on the show website, so contacted the CVPA for more info.

    And I think my definition of 'area' is a bit smaller than yours. If I have to drive more than an hour to get there, it's out of my area :) The biggest 'city' around, Savannah, GA is over an hour away with not much in between. But I'm loving the farm life.
     
  4. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Oh I do understand about what might define "an area". Nonetheless, getting birds from someone, even 500 miles away, via a number of means, including shipping via mail, a persona passing through, meeting up at show, etc, are all very common ways by which people get the quality birds they need to start off on the right foot.

    So worth it. I've hauled birds 12-14 hours to and from, mailed chicks or juvies across the country, met up "half way" with people to accept or deliver birds. It's a pretty natural part of this hobby, to be honest about it.

    Only thing sold near me is feedstores with bins of hatchery stock being re-sold. If those were what I was after? Not a problem. But the quality of RI Red birds, White Plymouth Rocks and Barred Plymouth Rocks that I breed now? No, not available there, LOL Not a chance.
     

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