A question on loose dogs

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Fredster, Jan 9, 2009.

  1. Fredster

    Fredster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 21, 2007
    Alabama
    I'm having a problem with a loose dog around my house. I'd have posted this in the pests/predators area, but the dog isn't bothering or harassing my chickens, it's bothering the two livestock guardian dogs I have watching over my chickens.

    Watching the dog, it's relatively obvious it wants to play. It's not aggressive at all, just bows in the classic playful pose, but it's distracting my dogs from their job (or making them work harder by causing them to address him as a potential threat, perhaps) and I'm afraid there's going to be trouble if I don't do something. Either he's going to try to get in with my dogs, or they're going to try and get out.

    Whenever he's around, my dogs track him along the fence line as a threat, barking incessantly. He just leads them round and round, as though he thinks it's a game. If I go out there, he runs from me, and if I fire the .22 from the back door (not at him, just to make a noise) he runs off too.

    But he inevitably comes back.

    Last night, I think he was around most of the night because the dogs barked all night long. Not their serious "you need to come check things" bark, but the "something's out there and I'm letting it know this is my spot" bark. It was out there when I went out to start my morning chores, and it ran off when it saw me.

    The dog has a collar, and looks well-fed. Problem is, I have no idea who it belongs to, so I wouldn't know which neighbor to contact. I live out in the county, where there's no real animal control, and I don't know about trying to trap it. I'm concerned that anything I use as bait right outside my fence might entice my dogs to try getting out. They're Great Pyrs, a breed already known for their escape abilities. I don't need to give them any incentive to test their boundaries.

    I know I could SSS the dog, and if it was trying to get to my chickens I probably would. I just don't like the thought of killing someone's pet for just trying to play with my dogs.

    Any advice?
     
  2. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Can you catch the dog to check the collar for tags? (Since it sounds friendly)

    And if you do catch it and it lacks tags, could you have handy some way of affixing a note to its collar - maybe rolled up in a film can and duct-taped onto the collar - to let the owner know that his dog is coming around bothering your livestock and that he needs to be kept home for his own safety, vis-a-vis your right to protect your animals.

    Good luck,

    Pat
     
  3. ChickenFanaticAB

    ChickenFanaticAB Chillin' With My Peeps

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    definitely sounds like someones pet. I would just go around to a couple neighbors houses and ask them if the dog is theirs or if they know who's it is. I understand that you don't want your dogs to be distracted, but that is certainly not a reason to SSS a nice dog. Someone might be looking for the dog, and if they aren't and they are just letting him run loose, tell them the situation and if they don't lock the dog up it might be time to do something...all of this assumes of course that you find the owner. If not, I would try to get the dog to come to me and see if it has a tag, and if not that, re-home the dog.
     
  4. burley

    burley Out Of The Brooder

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    Only my opinion but I think your main responsibility is to your animals. you MUST keep your dogs on your side of the fence! They will eventually calm down and not see this dog as a threat, May take a long time but, it will happen. I raise anatolians and they are amazing guard dogs and know in their heart that they are smarter than their owner.[​IMG] If that dog comes over your fence and your dogs kill it. Here is the harsh part. And i am not saying I agree or disagree but another breeder told it to me.. get rid of the carcas. Your dogs were doing what they were ment to do. Thousands of years of breeding to kill that intruder and right or wrong you don't need the headach of prooving that to anybody. good luck.
     
  5. horsejody

    horsejody Squeaky Wheel

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    Waterloo, Nebraska
    I would ask all of the neighbors about it. I would also continue to try to catch it. If it has tags, contact the owner and ask them to keep it home. If it has no tags, take it to the pound or to a rescue. If you do find the owner and they continue to let the dog roam, take it to the pound or to a rescue. Roaming dogs are a tragedy waiting to happen.
     
  6. rooster0209

    rooster0209 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 7, 2008
    North Dakota
    Call your neighbors and find out whot he dog belongs too. they may not even be aware its roaming that far.

    Catch the dog and take a look at its collar and see if there are ID tags or a vet rabies tag, either way their might be some ID.

    Don't kill it. It is obviously not causing harm.
     
  7. chickenpiedpiper

    chickenpiedpiper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    New Durham NH
    I agre killing it isnt neccesary at this stage, but catching it has its own set of risks, so be careful. A fearful dog can strike out just as fast as an aggressive dog, but sometimes with more damage cause it is not expected! So Use great care, when trying to read the collar and tags!

    Do you have snow in your area? can you go for a walk and follow the tracks? its not fun tromping thru the snow, but it may give you at least a clue to directionality of the correct neighbors. If you could build his trust, by putting out a bowl of food, in and area, like a pen, or porch? away from your dogs, so you are not providing temptation, and not near them, at all, you may succeed in getting closer. Unfortunately, by yelling and firing at the animal, you have made that task a bit harder for yourself, but not unachievable!

    Take pictures of the dog, and put up a sign at a local intersection? Store? He may have been abandoned, or dumped, or he may just be traveling! Carry small dog buscuits with you, when you see him, toss some his way, then walk away. Making sure you give your own dogs some, in plain view.

    Patience is the trick to winning the confidence of fearful dogs, patience and consistancy. Since he is not after your chickens, it sounds like you have the time and abilitie to be able to do right by him, he may have just been badly treated by previous people, and need a second chance.

    Good Luck!
     
  8. Fredster

    Fredster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 21, 2007
    Alabama
    As soon as the dog sees or hears me, it runs away, even when I'm trying to sweet talk it. I don't see me being able to get close enough to check for a tag because of that, and at the risk of sounding self-centered, I'm not inclined to spend hours and hours trying to befriend a dog that shouldn't be on my property in the first place, just to check tags.

    I live on the major road in my 1-light town, and I know the dog doesn't belong to anyone right around me. Problem is, since it's the major road, there are a good number of houses on it.


    Quote:Definitely no snow in Alabama. [​IMG]

    For some clarification, I tried coaxing the dog first before I started intentionally running it off. I didn't start running it off until it made it clear (to me) it wasn't interested in me, just the dogs.



    Thanks for the replies / suggestions, everyone!
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2009
  9. horsejody

    horsejody Squeaky Wheel

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    Maybe you could take one of your dogs out on a leash and hope it comes close. With the assistance of another person you might be able to get hold of it.
     
  10. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Ontario, Canada
    Well, if you can't catch it, it would at least be worth going around to all your neighbors within a half mile or so and asking if it's their dog. Even if you don't think so, you could be surprised.

    Good luck,

    Pat
     

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