A Swamp Monster Hatched In My 'Bator!

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by MissPrissy, Jun 12, 2008.

  1. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    May 7, 2007
    Forks, Virginia
    This is one of my bators after the goose eggs hatch finished this morning.

    [​IMG]

    I can't even tell you how filthy it really should be because I took the liner out several times when I took out babies and washed it off. It was just gross. This bator stinks. My 10 yr old DD wanted to know what kind of pond scum or swamp mud I had rolled the eggs in to make the bator so filthy. It was nothing I did. It is all part of hatching goose eggs. Even some duck and chicken hatches are filthy too.

    This is why you MUST sterilize your incubator between hatches.

    If it looks like this can you imagine what might be growing that you can't see?

    I have answered many threads on this forum about failed hatches. It is surprising the number of hatchers who don't know to sterilize their incubators. This is a must do process and not one you can fudge on. Bacteria that cannot be seen can grow in your incubator and cause every single hatch to fail over and over again.

    I cannot stress enough how important it is to keep your incubators clean and sterilized for use.

    I get alot of questions about how I keep my bators clean. Here is how I do it:

    I take them apart completely. The electronic pieces are wiped down with a clean cloth soaked in bleach water. I leave them to air dry.

    [​IMG]

    The incubators get an initial soak in bleach water.

    [​IMG]

    They are rinsed and scrubbed with antibacterial soap and hot water. Then rinsed again and given a final soak in diluted bleach water.

    Once dry I set them in the sun for several hours.

    By late afternoon they are ready to be put back together.

    [​IMG]

    Ready for the next hatch. Between the bleach and the direct sun you can't find any trace of the swamp monster or its babies in my bator.

    [​IMG]

    Pretty clean looking, huh? Just the way I like it!

    So, remember, keep your bators clean, clean, clean, for better, healthier, successful hatches.
     
  2. LoneCowboy

    LoneCowboy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 26, 2007
    Longmont, CO
    Good post Miss P. I haven't taken mine completely apart, but I scrub them in soap and water and spray them down with bleach water and set them in the sun. I guess that's not enough.
     
  3. Alaska animal lover

    Alaska animal lover Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 30, 2008
    Palmer, Alaska
    Thanks for sharing! You take such good care of us.[​IMG]
     
  4. MRNpoultry

    MRNpoultry Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 2, 2008
    Gibsonville, NC
    Great post! [​IMG]

    When I get my incubator (new) do I need to clean it out?
     
  5. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Forks, Virginia
    Brand new it is fine. After every use you need to clean it well.
     
  6. MRNpoultry

    MRNpoultry Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 2, 2008
    Gibsonville, NC
    Ok, thanks
     
  7. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Absolutely essential to disinfect those bators! MissP is right. Too many hatches are lost when bacteria builds up in there.
     
  8. Rare Feathers Farm

    Rare Feathers Farm Overrun With Chickens

    Good post! I always take mine apart & bleach the heck outta them, then rinse. GEEZ!

    I can only imagine the smell of that 'bator![​IMG] Maybe I don't want goose eggs afterall? [​IMG]
     
  9. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    May 7, 2007
    Forks, Virginia
    Quote:Not as bad as a rotten egg! LOL
     
  10. Mattake2

    Mattake2 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 11, 2008
    Great info for all of us "new folks"!
     

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