A Temp Question

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by OldGuy43, Feb 8, 2013.

  1. OldGuy43

    OldGuy43 Chillin' With My Peeps

    I've been meaning to ask this for sometime, and I guess this is the time. Not that I currently plan on hatching my own, but I'm just curious.

    A few months ago I was watching a series on farming in Victorian and Edwardian times and the researchers were living and working, as much a possible exactly as folks did in that time period. Same housing, same tools, everything. One of the things that really grabbed my attention was their incubator.

    It was made of wood and consisted, as far as I could see of two drawers. A larger one for the eggs and a smaller one that held a candle. As far as I could see there wasn't even a thermometer and they got a good hatch. That begs the question are temperatures really that critical?

    Unfortunately, both series have been removed because of copyright laws. [​IMG]
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe True BYC Addict

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  3. OldGuy43

    OldGuy43 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Interesting stuff! Thank you. [​IMG]
     
  4. esoaksranch

    esoaksranch Out Of The Brooder

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    This is good very very good. Living in Florida too much heat is easy.
     
  5. Knittycat

    Knittycat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hatchers at that time still used a bi-metal thermostat. When the temp reaches a certain point, the lid comes off the water heater thingy (sorry, had a couple of beers, not braining so good at the moment) and releases the heat into the air rather than using it to heat the water. The heated water circulates in pipes in the cabinet, heating the air in the hatcher area. The knowledge that different metals expanded at different rates at higher temperatures has been known for a long time. You can still buy kerosene lantern powered hatchers today! I've seriously considered buying an antique one and restoring it or building one from scratch. The benefit is, when the power goes out, you're still incubating the eggs. :)

    https://www.lehmans.com/p-1273-kerosene-powered-chicken-egg-incubator.aspx

    [​IMG]
     
  6. OldGuy43

    OldGuy43 Chillin' With My Peeps

    As I stated in my original post; What they used was nothing but two drawers. It looked nothing like this picture. I wish the video hadn't been removed from YouTube so that you could see it for yourself. Incidentally, all of the equipment that they used was vintage, not a replica.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2013
  7. Knittycat

    Knittycat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm willing to bet dollars to doughnuts that there was still a bi-metal thermostat working it's magic somewhere in there. I'd love to see the vid though. Too bad it's been taken down.
     
  8. esoaksranch

    esoaksranch Out Of The Brooder

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    Did it look like this?

    [​IMG]
     
  9. OldGuy43

    OldGuy43 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sorta, but it wasn't nearly that pretty. The wood had an unfinished, rough hewn look to it, and I'm sure that the only heat source was either a candle or an alcohol lamp.

    [​IMG] I found both online. If you have about 18 hours to spare they're here:

    http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/victorian-farm/

    and here:

    http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/edwardian-farm/

    Both are a real eyeopener. [​IMG] and give you a true insight into the life of that time. Word of warning; Once I started watching, I found it really difficult to stop. Thank you BBC.

    However, the point I was trying to make is that keeping the temperature at some precise number may not be a critical as some believe. My theory was confirmed by ChickenCanoe early on in post number 2. Thank you CC. [​IMG]
     

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