A thought about fertility

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by HARRY47264, Apr 1, 2017.

  1. HARRY47264

    HARRY47264 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I just put my eggs on lockdown 24 eggs first hatch of my new Octagon 20 advanced .When I candled I only had 12 living chicks 6 Bielefelders and 6 Cream Legbars. my last hatch I had only 10 out of 39 non fertile mixed breeds.
    Each pen has 1 roo and 6 hens I have observed both roos mating and scratches on the hens backs.
    The non fertile eggs looked as fresh as the day they were laid no blood or embryo development.


    I was wondering if there is any feed or supplements I can give to increase the fertility of my roosters
    I know commercial producers of hatching eggs feed different diets to hens and roos. the roo feeder is higher up then the hens feeder Is this practice to increase his fertility.
    Have a nice nite
    Harry
     
  2. PD-Riverman

    PD-Riverman Overrun With Chickens

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    If a commercial producer if feeding the roosters differently it probably is because they do not lay eggs so they really do not need the same feed as the hens----But I have never read this info---so I do not know. I would not feel it has anything to do with fertility.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2017
  3. HARRY47264

    HARRY47264 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 16, 2016
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    Thanks PD-Riverman I think I will do some research Keith Smith Farms is one of the biggest chicken producer in Arkansas and they have a local office.
    Have a nice morning
    Harry
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. AllynTal

    AllynTal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree with PD. I don't think they feed roosters a different diet to make them more fertile. Roosters generally get more protein and they don't need the calcium that laying hens need. The high amount of calcium that laying hens need is actually harmful for the boys in the long run. A diet formulated specifically for a rooster's needs, however, would make him more healthy and robust, which in turn makes him more fertile than a rooster that isn't as healthy and robust.
     

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