?? about keeping chicks warm

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by AndChicksMake10, Aug 12, 2008.

  1. AndChicksMake10

    AndChicksMake10 Out Of The Brooder

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    Surprise! The order I thought would arrive in mid-September is coming next week! We've pulled together all the brooding supplies (10 gal aquarium, feeder, waterer, thermometer, towel, starter feed) except the heat source. I've read the posts about why not to use a heating pad, but I wonder why it wouldn't work to put the pad under only half of the tank, so the chicks can move to the other side if they feel hot. Any more experienced folk ever tried this?

    I have a heating pad (which makes it convenient), plus I read the article in this month's Backyard Poultry that says chicks born in August and later need a controlled light source or they'll mature too fast for good laying health. The heat lamp would be on 24/7. How fancy do I honestly need to go?
     
  2. Ladysonja

    Ladysonja Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Congrats on your "almost" new arrivals...

    As for the heating pad, you'll have to wait for a more experience BYC'r who can answer that question.

    As for my girls/guys and the heat lamp... Here is what I am doing... I'm not sure if I am right or wrong, but my peeps are doing fine with my setup... Of course, read everyting to help answer your questions...

    I have a heat source on my peeps from about 700am until about 930pm. Mine are in a cardboard box. I have them off the floor, away from windows and any draft sources. When it is bed time I take a large bath towel and cover the brooder box.

    When I wake up in the moring, I turn on the heat source before removing the towel for about 10-15 minutes and then remove the towel slowly to keep from causing a draft. All nine of my peeps are ready to eat, drink and start a new day.

    I hope this helps.
     
  3. AndChicksMake10

    AndChicksMake10 Out Of The Brooder

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    Interesting -- any particular reason you turn off the heat at night? I think I'll keep ours on the enclosed porch, so the light wouldn't bother anybody (except maybe the neighbors. hmm)

    We're expecting 7 chicks -- fostering one for neighborhood friends, and I ordered a couple of extras (it was late at night when I ordered. We really only wanted 4). I'm still pondering coop plans (it's gotta be tiny) but I've got a bit of time on that.

    Congrats on your healthy chicks!
     
  4. Year of the Rooster

    Year of the Rooster Sebright Savvy

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    I would like to know if you could use a heating pad too. I have one and I'm on a tight budget [​IMG] I hope someone answers soon...
     
  5. Wildsky

    Wildsky Wild Egg!

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    Hmmmmmmmmmmmmm I've not used a heat pad, I guess it would work, but you would need to be EXTRA careful it doesn't get too hot and burn feet.

    I used a ceramic heat bulb - used for reptiles, worked really well.

    I started to turn off heat during the day - and then put the chicks out during the day in a tractor to scratch around and such.

    My mom hens have their babies out free-ranging at around 3 days old...... I have mom's now with guinea keets - they were hatched on Wdnesday - out since friday free-ranging with moms. They're having a BLAST!
     
  6. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    I've used a heat pad on lowest settings but it's still kind of a mess to deal with and harder to determine if the temp is right for the chick as you can't watch their "huddle" behavior as you could under an overhead heat source. For 7 chicks, that 10 gallon is gong to get small very fast.
     
  7. chilisweet

    chilisweet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    we just received our reptile red light with an adjustable dimmer on it, to turn down the light/heat when necessary. they seem to already love it, and are in fact, sleeping like rocks at the moment.

    ditto the comment on the tank being too small too soon. Do you have a semi large plastic container you can move them to, or use instead of the tank?

    also, ditto to AndChicksMake10's question...why do you turn the light off at night? Wouldn't that be when they need the heat, rather than the day?

    ~Caran
     
  8. Ladysonja

    Ladysonja Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I'm not sure where you are located... depending on your location will help determine if turning off the light at night or using it as an added heat source will be determined how cold it gets in your area in the early evenings and during the night.

    I read somewhere here on BYC that chicks exposed to temps under 70 degrees will become sickly. I wish I had that thread link to send you.

    Since my peeps are in the house and the temps indoors are about the same all day long, I don't see the need to leave the heat lamp on all night long. Secondly, by turning if off it helps them figure out day time from night time.

    Again... I'm no expert... but I hope the information I share is useful and helps you find the right situation for your new arrivals.
     
  9. AndChicksMake10

    AndChicksMake10 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 12, 2008
    Well, the question turned out to be moot, in my case at least. The heating pad didn't do much to warm up the tank (I was thinking of putting it underneath the tank, not under the pine chips), so I got a regular heatlamp and 150 w bulb. It's going to be plenty warm -- I just checked.

    I did figure out that the former hamster tank was going to be too small too soon, so I've pulled out a big plastic tub that I used to soak my scuba gear in (no time, no money to dive these days). That ought to keep them for a bit longer.

    Thanks for your replies. I'll post a pic when the babies arrive -- should be Tuesday or Wednesday.
     

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