Accidental injection of fluid into lungs

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by SpeckledHills, Jan 10, 2010.

  1. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Songster

    2,103
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    May 25, 2008
    Idaho/Utah
    I was following instructions to inject fluids where back of wing joins back in my emaciated hen. Now she is GURGLING!
    I checked diagram at http://i180.photobucket.com/albums/x301/eggcetra_farms/chicken_anatomy.jpg and see her LUNGS are right there!
    I tried reinserting needle & siphoning while truning her upside down. Only air!
    Her comb is still red--That means she's still getting enough oxygen, yes?
    Help!
    Is there anything else I can try?
    What risks will this add?
    She is in very weak condition from internal fungus problem probly in intestines.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2010
  2. chickenbottom

    chickenbottom Songster

    Dec 30, 2008
    hollister, florida
    maybe try putting her face down twards the ground and massage her as close to her lungs as you can get hopefully the liquid will come out that way thats only a suggestion. hope you find a solution
     
    crb1487 likes this.
  3. chickenzoo

    chickenzoo Emu Hugger

    How much fluid was injected? I have had some luck with tubing them through the hole behind tougne and sucking it out with a syringe, the quickly pulling out the tube. As a last resort only though.....
     
    crb1487 likes this.
  4. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Songster

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    Idaho/Utah
    THANK YOU for quick responses!!

    I put about 9 mL behind each wing. Instructions I think said the fluid would create a "blister" where injected. I don't see any on either side...
    I don't know how much got in lungs.
    On right side, air came in when I drew back a little (to check that I wasn't in blood vessel) before starting.
    On left side, it wouldn't draw back easily. But I didn't notice gurgling til after the left side.

    Are their lungs pouch-like? Or more sponge-like? If sponge-like, it seems it might be hard to get fluid to puddle in a concentrated area where I can withdraw???
     
  5. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Songster

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    How likely would fluid be to be absorbed on its own? How long would it probably take to be absorbed?
     
  6. OhioEggs

    OhioEggs In the Brooder

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    Springfield, OH
    What fluid is it? What's it's purpose?
     
  7. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Songster

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    May 25, 2008
    Idaho/Utah
    Lactated Ringer's. It's intended to be given to animals to help them when they've become dehydrated.
     
  8. OhioEggs

    OhioEggs In the Brooder

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    Springfield, OH
    Idk what to do. I'd keep her warm as possible and hope she feels better. Watch to make sure she eats and drinks.
     
  9. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Songster

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    May 25, 2008
    Idaho/Utah
    Quote:Thank you for the idea! I have a "butterfly" tube & syringe set-up I can use to do that if I reach that point.

    By googling, I'm finding that this condition is called pulmonary edema. I'm reading info on treatment in people. I'm thinking I might not have actually penetrated lungs with the needle after all... It seems excess pressure on the outside of the membrane around the lungs might cause fluid to pass through?? Gonna keep reading, & watching this thread.
    Thanks for any help & suggestions!
     
    crb1487 likes this.
  10. fldiver97

    fldiver97 Songster

    Aug 5, 2009
    Middleton, WI
    If it is just LR hopefully it will get absorbed without too much trouble. Suctioning her, even if you manage to get into her windpipe/lugs may be iffy.....it is quite distressing and you have to be quick so she can breathe. Depending on where you actually ended up injecting. Fluid in the lungs, from whatever origin, will make her breathing sound rattling or gurgling. I have never given subcutaneous fluid for dehydration ubder wings as you describe but then I am a chicken newbie. I have given lots of fluid to cats, dogs, kittens and puppies and LR intravenously to sick sabirds after an oilspill. The few time we had birds we had to give subcutaneous fluid to, I recall using the back/shoulder area. You have to be careful to angle the iv more parellel to the tissue so you stay in the tissue...I would keep her close and observe her breathing. Don't know if this is any help, I am sure some 'oldtimers' have good advise. ope she gets better quick!!!! [​IMG]
     
    crb1487 likes this.

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