ACK!!! frostbite!

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by missourichickenmama, Jan 16, 2009.

  1. missourichickenmama

    missourichickenmama SURPRISE!

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    My chicken's combs so far have all been very small, small enough that i did not have to worry about frostbite to much.& well... all of the sudden their combs have gotten huge! it happened slow enough that i did not notice it, until i noticed the characteristic black tips and shriveled skin. how do i treat it, and how do i prevent it?
     
  2. chicknmania

    chicknmania Crowing 11 Years

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    You can try to prevent it by putting petroleum jelly on their combs and wattles. There is nothing I know of you can treat it with. Our roosters have had frostbite a few times...the damaged part will die and fall off. It will heal, but of course they are disfigured after that. and I'm sure it must hurt. It is a serious problem for us b/c most of our chickens are not at all easy to catch, and they free range.
     
  3. Brunty_Farms

    Brunty_Farms Songster

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    I don't think you can treat it. I'm pretty sure once they get it they will end up losing the part that turns black.

    I've heard that vasoline will prevent it? Also maybe use some sort of a heat source.
     
  4. SterlingAcres

    SterlingAcres Songster

    Apr 17, 2008
    Poconos, PA
    I put a heat lamp in the barn for the 6 week old chicks. My roos are starting to get some frostbite (and fighting wounds) at -7 and -14 days here. I think they're dunking their heads in the water bucket, because we didn't have any issues before.

    Vaseline works, but my chickens aren't big fans of it.
     
  5. Cuban Longtails

    Cuban Longtails Flock Mistress

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    First of all, you can't prevent what has already happened. You can hopefully aid it in not escalating into something worse. In my opinion, if the combs are already swelling, then the infection is already set in. In such a situation I would go ahead and dub the comb, since it's going to fall off anyway (provided you can keep the infection from killing your bird).

    For information regarding dubbing, please see here , or purchase the latest edition of Backyard Poultry magazine. The magazine has an excellent article on frost bite prevention.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2009
  6. You may want to offer electrolytes with terramycin (antibiotic) too.
    Some opinions on this in various threads which you can check at the top of this page under the Search feature. Good luck with your babies, ouch!

    [​IMG]
     
  7. missourichickenmama

    missourichickenmama SURPRISE!

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    thank you!

    I think the reason that I did not notice the frostbite was probably because they will not keep their heads still enough for me to see it, they are perpetual motion machines... the reason i noticed it on the one was because i calmed it down enough to pick it up, and I saw it.
     
  8. Chicken Woman

    Chicken Woman Incredible Egg

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    I have a RIR hen that has black tips on her comb. I was told that as long as I keep neosporin on her and bag balm to keep it from getting any worse she would be ok. If you dub then don't you have to seperate from the flock until the wound heals ? Won't the other chickens peck at the wound ?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 16, 2009
  9. Cuban Longtails

    Cuban Longtails Flock Mistress

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    Quote:Generally dubbing should take place in the evening, while all the chickens are at roost. Put the bird back on the roost afterwards and in the morning all is well. The use of flour or styptic powder will help staunch any bleeding that occurs.
     
  10. Brunty_Farms

    Brunty_Farms Songster

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    I wouldn't dub them unless you have too. This should be done when they are a lot younger as your going to add unwanted stress to an already stressed bird.

    Just my opinion.
     

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