Actual Corid DOSE (not per gallon) by body weight

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by CheriK, Apr 18, 2012.

  1. CheriK

    CheriK Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 4, 2012
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    Hi Folks,

    Trying to start aprolium treatment for our six 5-6 week old chicks who I presume are not supressing coccidia since their poops are becoming more and more runny, black, and some blood now. Our feed store only sells Corid labelled for cattle use, same concentration (9.6% solution) that I've seen listed here in other posts. However, I would like to calculate the dose more accurately than just x cc/gallon, since I prefer to dose the correct amount based on their weight. The cattle dose is listed as 10mg/kg. Does anyone know if the poultry dose is the same?

    Thanks,
    Cheri
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    The dosage for the 9.6% liquid solution is universal for all chicks/chickens...doesnt matter what their weight is.
     
  3. CheriK

    CheriK Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 4, 2012
    Northern California
    I want the dose per kg, not the amount to add in the water. The water amount is an estimate based on the average amount a hen will drink and I prefer to dose more accurately directly, especially since my girls keep spilling their water. . . too much waste of expensive meds & I'm type-A and want higher accuracy & assurance that the get the dose because I've squirted it down their throat ;-)

    I also found this:http://www.sheepandgoat.com/articles/coccidtable205.pdf, which lists dose for both cattle & poultry as 5mg/kg, which is 1/2 the dose for cattle on my bottle. Makes me suspect the 5mg/kg in this table is the lower, prevention dose & not the higher treatment dose. But I still don't know if the dose for cattle & poultry is the same.
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Good luck!
     
  5. CheriK

    CheriK Out Of The Brooder

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    Was able to get a vet friend to look it up in an exotic animal formulary (of course, she wants me to run a $50 fecal on the $3.00 chicken. . .). Dose is 13-26 mg/kg, very different than cattle dose listed on bottle & the dose listed in the table above. Now off to torture. . . um, medicate. . .my girls.
     
  6. klmclain1

    klmclain1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 14, 2011
    That's an extremely high dosage. Good luck.
     
  7. klmclain1

    klmclain1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 14, 2011
    You might want to research how Corid works... there may be a biological reason it needs to be aborbed with water in a slower manner.
     
  8. CheriK

    CheriK Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 4, 2012
    Northern California
    No, it's just commonly used as a herd health treatment and putting it in the water makes it easier than giving individually. Most medications for agricultural use will commonly be given in water if they can be taken orally. I don't need to do herd health (most of of don't, with a handful of backyard chickens) because I only have 6 chickens! It's much more accurate to give medications directly based on the animal's weight than to put them in food/water, where you have to estimate consumption, and a sick animal might not eat/drink a normal amount. Some medications do need to be divided into two or three daily doses, but if it can be provided orally in food/water, most medications are safe directly. And most antiparasitics are given as a single daily dose.

    What I listed was the oral (i.e. direct) dosage. Dosage for adding to water and food were also provided, based on volume of food or water. Dose actually doesn't seem high based on the volume of water they drink and the water dose of 9.6ml/gallon; it worked out to about 0.15ml per chicken at the high end, so just under a ml total for all of them, and they drink just under a pint of water in a day (when they don't spill half of it!). Volume-wise, that correlates. That amount of medication is so small, about 2 drops, it's so easy to just give it to them, and I know they're getting what they need.

    If anyone cares, reference is the Exotic Animal Formulary by James W. Carpenter.
     
  9. WI FarmChick

    WI FarmChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 22, 2012
    Wisconsin
    Good luck with your chicken. :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2012

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