ACV added to water

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by CricketR4, Feb 15, 2013.

  1. CricketR4

    CricketR4 Songster

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    Feb 11, 2013
    Mebane, NC
    So I read on here that I can add apple cider vinegar to my chickens water to prevent paste butt. I couldn't find the thread to see how much to put in a 2.5 gallon bell waterer and if it's ok for my ducks. Sorry if this is a repeat question.
     

  2. countrygoddess

    countrygoddess Songster

    Use raw apple cider vinegar which contains the "mother" (one brand is Bragg's). I usually add about two teaspoons or so per gallon. I don't really measure, I just add a couple splashes from the mason jar my homemade ACV is in to my 5 gallon waterer. Don't use ACV in galvanized waterers.
     
  3. CricketR4

    CricketR4 Songster

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    Ok, so quick question: why not use it in a galvanized waterer? I probably already know the answer to this, but... also, what's the difference between regular acv and raw acv? I'm a bit confused.
     
  4. countrygoddess

    countrygoddess Songster

    The acidity of the vinegar will corrode and damage the galvanization, which is a protective coating of zinc.

    Raw apple cider vinegar has not been subjected to the heat of pasteurization, which kills the beneficial bacteria, known as the "mother". The mother is part of what turns apple cider into vinegar and it's actually a symbiotic relationship between a bacteria and yeast (aka, SCOBY). When you look at a jar of raw ACV you'll see this swirling mass of what looks like mold in it. That's the mother. One of the benefits of using ACV in chickens' drinking water is that it increases the acidity of the gut, making it difficult for bad bacteria to get a foothold. And the bacteria in the mother acts probiotically in the gut.
     
  5. CricketR4

    CricketR4 Songster

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    Ok, so it was what I thought about the galvanized... Well, my waterer is galvanized, and I can't afford to buy a new one that's not. Is there any other way to help my one girl that has paste butt?
     

  6. countrygoddess

    countrygoddess Songster

    A pasted vent in chicks can be caused by being too cold, too hot, or an intolerance to the feed. Their gut flora just hasn't risen to the numbers needed to keep it from happening in the first place. So, check the heat in the brooder. Switch feeds. Feed them a little bit of active culture yogurt (not too much or will cause diarrhea). But usually, they outgrow it. Just keep an eye that the vent isn't crusted over--that can lead to death.
     
  7. CricketR4

    CricketR4 Songster

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    It's just one girl, she's completely pasted. There is no electricity in the coop, so not too hot, but maybe a bit too cold? I'm thinking about switching to a Nutrena brand feed (currently feeding Southern States Layer), I can't afford anything more than Southern States right now, so Purina is out.
     
  8. CricketR4

    CricketR4 Songster

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    BTW, it's an 8-9 month old chicken, not a little chick...
     
  9. countrygoddess

    countrygoddess Songster

    Yes, I'd try the yogurt. But again, not too much. I gave my girls a heap of yogurt once and there were puddles everywhere the next day. :hmm You can also buy probiotics, but I bet they're a bit pricey. Maybe switching her feed is what she needs. Give it a try. You can get the poop off her feathers by running her bum under warm, running water and rubbing it off with a wash cloth. I've even cut feathers away. I've read since then that the feathers will bleed, which isn't something I thought of, but they didn't. I didn't cut them down to the skin, though, just enough to keep the poop from being able to land on the puff under their vents.
     

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