Adding a new roo, tips?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by cmsagirl, Apr 6, 2016.

  1. cmsagirl

    cmsagirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 6, 2015
    I have 3 hens that were with a mature rooster for as long as I've known, but sadly he turned mean and drew blood on several occasions so he's gone. I have a new roo I'm looking at and was wondering how he would be or more importantly how the hens would be if I went on and put him in the coop with them? He's mature like the previous roo.
     
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  2. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop

    If he's mature he can simply be placed in the coop and they will accept him. Though if he's from an unknown source he should be quarantined away from the flock for 2-4 weeks prior to introduction.
     
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  3. cmsagirl

    cmsagirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 6, 2015
    Awesome thanks!
     
  4. Neveralone

    Neveralone Out Of The Brooder

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    Perfect timing. I had the EXACT same issue. As a side note, my girls free range, should my new roo be kept in the coop for a few days, so he understands "home?"
     
  5. cmsagirl

    cmsagirl Out Of The Brooder

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    I would deffinitely keep him in the coop for a few days so he'll understand home. I have our boy in a smaller tractor next to the girl's coop, and while they were out free ranging I let him out to see if theyd get along. 2 of them didnt pay him much attention but my golden laced wyandotte ran over and rolled him over. He then ran back into his coop and started grazing. I was surprised he went back into his coop bc he's only been in it and "home" for 3days
     
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  6. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    The rooster will go where the hens go. He won't be letting them get away. Adding a rooster to a group of hens without an established roo is one of the easiest adds in the chicken world.

    Once I did and out with the old and in with the new, in one afternoon. Not a single hen looked twice.

    Mrs K
     
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  7. cmsagirl

    cmsagirl Out Of The Brooder

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    I wish my hens had gotten that message! Lol. I think the problem is that my new roo isn't fully mature yet. He was born around Christmas time is what the lady said that I bought him from
     
  8. Neveralone

    Neveralone Out Of The Brooder

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    Well, I placed my new roo in a tractor coop, just so he knows where "home" is and noticed he's "rattling" at times when he breathes UGH! (He seems to act fine, not lethargic and was pecking at the food.)
    Contacted the lady and asked if any of her birds had any respiratory issues. Well, she says, "they had the 'snarfees' this winter." (Snarfees=sniffles??) Her husband had been treating them with tetracycline x 4weeks in the water. They said they haven't noticed any symptoms for the past month.
    The roo is a Belgium danver, I'm unfamiliar with the breed. He's little but I believe an adult. Sorry for taking this thread sideways....things kinda went sideways.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2016
  9. cmsagirl

    cmsagirl Out Of The Brooder

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    No worries! I've never heard of the breed and don't know much about medicating chickens myself
     
  10. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Adding an immature cockerel is a whole nother ballgame compared to adding a mature cock over a year old.
    Those old girls will kick his butt, put him in his place, teach him some manners(if he's capable of learning)....hopefully without any injuries.
     

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