Adding a rooster to my flock ... ?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Rick&Chris, Jul 14, 2019.

  1. Rick&Chris

    Rick&Chris Songster

    Hi all, I am contemplating adding a rooster to my flock of 10 ten month old hens. If I get one, can he be around 4-6 months old? Will my girls behavior change towards me? They come when called (especially for blueberries). I don’t want to change how they act, but think it would be fun and protective to add a rooster.
     
  2. DobieLover

    DobieLover Easily distracted by chickens

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    Yes, your pullets will change their behavior towards you. They will start following him once he is accepted. Having a flock complete with a cockerel/rooster changes the dynamics. I think for the better. Others want their chickens more as pets and having a cockerel/rooster makes that much more difficult.
    If you decide to take the plunge, I recommend getting an older bird, an actual rooster, preferably one that was raised in a multi-generational flock. One that has already learned a lot and has shown no signs of human aggression.
    YOU also need to learn how to behave around them. I recommend you read this article before pursuing getting a rooster. Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2019
  3. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Free Ranging

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    If I were to add a male to your flock of 10 month old pullets I'd add one at least their age, maybe as old as two years. An immature cockerel's hormones are usually running wild, he has little to no self-control, he often makes life hard on the flock, and it can be hard for you to watch. If you add a male that has outgrown that immature adolescent phase it is usually much easier on the flock and you.

    Flock dynamics will change. I don't know how thy will change but here will be things different. I don't know what your facilities look like either. Adding an immature cockerel often requires more room than a mature male, plus the tighter I house them the more likely I am to have behavioral problems.

    What are your goals for adding a male? The only reason you need a rooster is if you want fertile eggs. Everything else is personal preference. There is nothing wrong with personal preference, that can be pretty powerful. But it is a choice, not a need. I recommend you keep as few males as possible and still meet your goals. That's not because you are guaranteed problems with more roosters, just that problems are more likely. I don't know of the right number for you is zero or one. If you do get one, have a plan ready to immediately implement of it doesn't work out.
     
  4. Rick&Chris

    Rick&Chris Songster


    I have access to a 15 month old rooster. I wanted to add to my flock for protection when they are outside of the coop/run. I have no interest in breeding or hatching eggs. Newbie question .... I assume it is OK to eat fertilized eggs??
     
  5. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Free Ranging

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    I'd go with that 15 month old. That should make for a very easy integration. When he meets the flock he should mate with a couple of the pullets top show it is his flock, then life is good.

    If you do not incubate fertile eggs there is no difference as far as eating them. Although some stores charge extra for fertilized eggs there is no difference in nutrition, taste, anything. People have been raising chickens in small towns and on farms for thousands of years and eating fertilized eggs. It doesn't hurt them.
     
  6. Rick&Chris

    Rick&Chris Songster

    Thank you!! When do you recommend that I integrate him, when the girls are sleeping, or in the morning when I am home to see how they interact?
     
    Trimurtisan likes this.
  7. Chef JimmyJ

    Chef JimmyJ Songster

    Just an FYI...It is commonly thought that a Blood Spot in an Egg means it's Fertilized...FALSE. Blood spots can form for a number of reasons, including a random broken Blood Vessel in the Chickens ovary or oviduct. A tear in the oviduct from strains to get an egg out. Minor damage from a fall and other non-issues. Blood Spots are harmless to people eating Eggs and can be ignored. The sign that a fresh egg is fertile can be hard to see, depending on how good your eyes are.:old It appears as a white spot with a ring around it on the Yolks Surface...JJ
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2019
  8. Rick&Chris

    Rick&Chris Songster

    Can the eggs still be left on the counter on washed?
     
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  9. Chef JimmyJ

    Chef JimmyJ Songster

    Yes, they can be stored at room temp. As long as room temp is not 99°F+...JJ
     
    Lady of McCamley and Trimurtisan like this.
  10. Rick&Chris

    Rick&Chris Songster

    Thank you, all!! When do you recommend that I integrate him, when the girls are sleeping, or in the morning when I am home to see how they interact?
     

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