Adding Water & Humidity Question REG. Little Giant 9200 Incubator

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by massoumicyrus, Nov 30, 2014.

  1. massoumicyrus

    massoumicyrus Out Of The Brooder

    28
    1
    24
    Jun 21, 2014
    Using a Little Giant 9200 Egg Incubator with the matching egg turner.

    I'm unsure of two things: How much water do I add, how often do I add water?

    Secondly:
    How important is humidity to monitor?
    How do I monitor humidity?
     
  2. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

    15,019
    2,497
    416
    Oct 11, 2014
    Gouverneur, NY
    Humidity is extremely important especially at hatch time. Opinions differ on days 1-17 about humidity, some people (myself included now) have gone with a "dry incubation" method in which the first 17 days you don't (unless you are in a very dry area that humidity is naturally less than 20%) add water and just keep an eye on the air cell (or egg weight if you choose that method) to make sure that you are loosing enough moisture from the egg, but not TOO much. On day 18, when you stop turning the eggs and you go into lockdown you need to make sure the humidity is upped to 65% +. You use a hygrometer (you can buy online or in stores) to messure the % of humidity. If you do not have enough humidity during the process the chick can become shrink wrapped and die if you have too much humidty the egg doesn't loose enough moisture and they can drown. So, yes, humidity is important. (The non dry method for days 1-17 most try to keep it between 40-55 I believe.)
    This time at lockdown I filled my water wells and I added wet sponges to my bator with the eggs. This worked well for me and it was much easier to slide out the sponge, wet it and slide it back in without compromising humidity during lockdown.
    Good luck on your future hatching.
     
  3. massoumicyrus

    massoumicyrus Out Of The Brooder

    28
    1
    24
    Jun 21, 2014
    So, I need to:
    1. Buy a hygrometer
    2. Put the hygrometer in the incubator?
    And then maintain those humidity levels of course during the days mentioned?

    For now:
    I put the eggs in and added water to fill the lower water wells - was this an incorrect move or is that an arbitrary question since I don't know the humidity levels?

    For reference:
    I'm located in Napa, CA and I have the incubator in my house.
     
  4. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

    5,387
    915
    291
    Dec 25, 2012
    I recommend both a hygrometer AND a psychrometer. If you only have one get the psychrometer It measures relative humidity better and it is harder to read but it is more accurate for use in an incubator than the horse hair driven hygrometer.

    When eggs go to piping the humidity in a still air incubator rises because of all the moisture released by hatching and drying chicks.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2014
  5. massoumicyrus

    massoumicyrus Out Of The Brooder

    28
    1
    24
    Jun 21, 2014
    OK, but I'm about 4 days in right now. -

    I'm in Napa, CA.

    Until I am able to get the necc. tools -- Filling the water wells and maintaining 100 F should be OK?
     
  6. StephensonC

    StephensonC Chillin' With My Peeps

    580
    46
    118
    Oct 14, 2014
    Richmond, Va
    I have the Little Giant 9300 and I just put a little water in the trays. I didn't fill them completely up, I would say I keep them about 1/3 full. The 9300 has a reading for humidity, and it's been staying around 45%-55%. If you have the trays full, then you might have too much humidity. When I need to remove some of the water, I roll a paper towel up into a small point, and stick it through the holes on the floor tray, and let it soak up some of the water. Good luck!
     
  7. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

    15,019
    2,497
    416
    Oct 11, 2014
    Gouverneur, NY
    Yes. And it was not an incorrect move if you are going to go with the normal incubation method, though I would pay very close attention to the eggs air cells especially w/o a hygrometer in there because you need to make sure the eggs are loosing the proper amount of humidity. I'm putting a link to the hatching page here on BYC I highly recommend giving it a read. It explains pretty much everything you need to know. https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/hatching-eggs-101

    I highly recommend that you make sure any and all thermometers are calibrated. I use three thermometers in my bator to make sure my readings are all relevant. I always recommend using at least two and everyone will tell you, (especially with your cheaper styrofoam incubators) never rely on the gauges that are built in/come with. They are known for being off and your temp will definitely make or break your hatch.
     
  8. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

    15,019
    2,497
    416
    Oct 11, 2014
    Gouverneur, NY
    If you have a forced air incubator your temps should average 99.5 through duration. If you have a still air (regardless of manufactor instructions) your bator should maintain 101-102 degrees.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by