Adult Rooster - Crow Changed

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Ravie, Nov 16, 2011.

  1. Ravie

    Ravie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 4, 2010
    Greenfield, Indiana
    Hi everyone,

    I have an 18-month-old rooster. He normally has a nice clear crow. Lately his voice seems to have changed and his crow is low and gravely. He seems to be healthy and alert. Is this normal? I didn't even recognize his crow at first. I thought one of my younger boys had just figured out how to make noise. It isn't a pretty sound.
     
  2. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Not normal. Feel his legs to see if they are warm. Warmth is a fever, probably a respiratory infection. VetRX is a good treatment. If legs aren`t warm, monitor the situation for a week or so and see if anything else changes........Pop
     
  3. Ravie

    Ravie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 4, 2010
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    I will go out and feel him in a moment. And let you know what I discover. Is VetRX a medication, then? Where might I find such a thing?
     
  4. Ravie

    Ravie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 4, 2010
    Greenfield, Indiana
    His legs are cool to the touch, his eyes are bright and clear, nostrils clear as well. His feathers are shiny and beautiful! He is curious and really does seem to be well.

    If I really strain my ears, I can hear that he's making a soft "click" sound sometimes while he walks around. It is very, very quiet.
     
  5. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Most feed stores have VetRX. If that little "click" turns into a rattle, something like a wheeze, then definately treat him.......Pop
     
  6. Knock Kneed Hen

    Knock Kneed Hen California Dream'in Chickens

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    If you can grab him up press your ear to his back. If you hear anything that sounds crackling it's fluid in his lungs and he needs Tylan. If you hear clicking that could be liquid in his lungs. Imagine your lungs like a sponge, now wet the sponge and each time you squeeze it it will make a crackly sound. (I'm visual so hope this helps explain).

    I just went through this with a little hen. She looked fine, acted fine, no signs of illness, but when her owner caught her up the stress got her breathing a little heavier than normal and you could hear that clicking from across the yard. If he does need to be treated then put him somewhere where you can keep him warm away from the rest of the flock and treat with Tylan. Keep separated for at least 10-14 days.
     
  7. Crehan

    Crehan Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 13, 2011
    Montgomery, AL
    MY ROO DID EXACTLY THE SAME!

    I took him to the vet and said it was a tipe of a infection under the lungs.
    Sadly he passed away the next month. [​IMG]
     
  8. Ravie

    Ravie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 4, 2010
    Greenfield, Indiana
    I looked up Tylan on TSC's web-site, but it says it's for cattle? Is there a separate variety for poultry? If the cattle medication is what I'm looking for, what kind of dose would I give to a 7-8lb rooster?


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  9. Knock Kneed Hen

    Knock Kneed Hen California Dream'in Chickens

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    I subscribed to this topic...I'm sorry, I don't know why it didn't show up for me. I copied this from dawg53 on another thread. It's good to keep this info for future reference:

    Most likely you are dealing with a possible respiratory disease. You can use tylan 50 injectable to treat them. Dosage is 1/2cc injected into the breast for 3 consecutive days for adult sized birds, 1/4cc for bantam sized birds.
    Make sure you angle the needle so you inject just under the skin, and not deep in the muscle tissue. You will need to use a large needle on your syringe due to the solution thickness of the tylan. (20 to 22 gauge needle works best.)
    Make sure you inject in a different spot each day. It's best to alternate breast when injecting.
    Tylan can be purchased at most feed stores, over the counter in the cattle section. Dont eat the eggs after treatment for at least 5 days after the last injection.
    You can also dose them orally with tylan 50. The dosage is the same as injecting. Dose them orally for 5 days instead of 3 days, it takes longer to absorb into their system when swallowed. Pull their wattles down and their mouth will open, have your preloaded syringe ready to slowly squirt it in the mouth, release the wattles and let the bird swallow the liquid on her own. Once you see improvement, continue treatment to completion, but no longer than the 3 or 5 day treatment period.
    Since it's a possible respiratory disease, I wouldnt donate sick birds to be sold at a fair, even after treatment. Birds with respiratory diseases remain carriers and can spread it to other birds. It's best that you maintain a closed flock and practice biosecurity. Here's a link to respiratory diseases: It seems the two main diseases that are currently prevelent are Infectious Coryza and
    Mycoplasma Gallisepticum (MG.) Scroll down to these two diseases and read about them. You can also read the other diseases that are similar if you wish.
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044


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  10. Frithest

    Frithest Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've heard that a really bad worm infestation can stop a rooster from crowing - literally worms in his throat. Hope it's not that!
     

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