Advice on neighbors dog

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Ldensmore, Apr 23, 2017.

  1. Ldensmore

    Ldensmore Out Of The Brooder

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    We just started letting our chickens free range about 2 weeks ago. Our neighbor has a lab/pit mix dog that has been coming down quite frequently since he moved back in the neighborhood. It has came down and chased the chickens back into their coop and bas been trying to get ahold of them. We have contacted him 4 times and asked him to keep the dog on a leash or at least watch him so he stays at home. He has said he would, but it has been here every time after talking to him. I just don't want it to chase my chickens or kill them. Do I call animal control? Advice on what to do?
     
  2. TalkALittle

    TalkALittle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Providing it's a friendly dog, next time it comes down leash it up and call Animal Control to remove it. Having to pay a fee and collect their dog may make them think twice about letting it roam at large.
     
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  3. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    If animal control is an option where you live, then yes - call them. Have it caught and taken to a pound. Every single time it comes to your place. If the problem is not resolved, you may need to fence your yard or keep your chickens penned. I know - it's not "fair" that we have to put up fences because others won't keep their animals under control, but ultimately, it's our responsibility to keep our chickens safe.
     
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  4. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Apply both options above in short order. Over time you will have more than the for-mentioned dog to give you troubles. Wildlife too.
     
  5. Howard E

    Howard E Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How large of an area do you have? Are they using? How many birds?

    If a person is truly free ranging birds, and their are dogs and predators about, you can expect many, if not most of them, to be lost. It is the nature of the business. They are an easy prey and everything, it seems, either likes to eat or kill chickens.

    So what to do? Rather than a full on free range, consider "yarding" them. In other words, confine them to a defined and protected yard. You keep the birds in and predators out with a fence. Best option hands down is an electric fence.

    For smallish areas, poultry netting. For larger areas, potentially measured in acres, multiple wire fences.

    With a hot electric fence, dog comes to visit and gets his face fried and tail blown off, leaves and doesn't come back. Same with most furry land based predators too. Isn't that what you want?
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2017
  6. Red5

    Red5 Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:I was looking to go the exact same route as you mentioned. I liked your advice there.
     
  7. bob869007

    bob869007 Out Of The Brooder

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    The problem is not the dog it is the neighbor. But the dog will pay the price for the neighbors ignorance.

    My steps for this. 1st time - Ask the neighborly nicely then immediately call animal control 2nd Time - Call the sheriff and file a complaint 3rd Time - Shoot the dog and not worry about it again


    I am a huge dog lover. I have two heelers and an old lab. My dogs run free but they know their limits because I taught them that. They will heal and stay at my side and have almost never been leashed. Any dog that has pit in it is a dog I do not want near my place. The breed is excellent, don't get me wrong but has its people problems. They are beautifully wonderful dogs, the problem is they are like Arnold the California Gov on steroids compared to a normal dog. If my dog was playing with a pitty and they got into it for real it's over so no pitty goes near my babies without personal interaction from me. When it comes to my loved ones and my livestock I am extremely protective. If by the third time the neighbor didn't control his dog he would not have to worry about it until his next one. It probably sounds a bit extreme but anything gets at my livestock is hitting the dinner table. I won't kill something unless I'm going to eat it. Btw, dog is a fine meal
     
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  8. Howard E

    Howard E Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Our neighbor told me today about her dog's encounter with my electric fence. Dog spotted our birds out and about and headed straight for them. Before anything could happen, however, dog tangled with the electric fence......let out a yip, did a u-turn and came straight back home. She says the dog ignores them now has never been back.

    So that is the response you want. Imagine, however, no fence........dog got in, chased and maybe killed some birds.........experience was fun and games. Now I'd have a problem with a dog always hanging around causing trouble and if the neighbor wasn't any help.......a potential conflict with them.

    But all that is moot. The fence did it's job.

    That outcome seems to repeat over and over. With dogs and other predators, with nothing but a physical barrier, if even that.....there is absolutely nothing to stop a predator and they have nothing to lose by trying to get it. An electric fence changes that. They have no clue what it was that hurt so bad, but most are smart enough to stop testing it once they know what it offers.

    I have a small are fenced off for some horses and although it is a simple single strand poly tape fence, it works to keep the kids in. The hardest part about it is to lead the horses through the gate to put them in. They know where the boundary is and start pulling back when they get near it. They have felt the wrath of that fence and want no part of it.
     
  9. snow5164

    snow5164 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The problem is not the dog it is the neighbor.  But the dog will pay the price for the neighbors ignorance.

    My steps for this.  1st time - Ask the neighborly nicely then immediately call animal control  2nd Time - Call the sheriff and file a complaint  3rd Time - Shoot the dog and not worry about it again


    I am a huge dog lover. I have two heelers and an old lab.  My dogs run free but they know their limits because I taught them that. They will heal and stay at my side and have almost never been leashed.  Any dog that has pit in it is a dog I do not want near my place. The breed is excellent, don't get me wrong but has its people problems. They are beautifully wonderful dogs, the problem is they are like Arnold the California Gov on steroids compared to a normal dog. If my dog was playing with a pitty and they got into it for real it's over so no pitty goes near my babies without personal interaction from me.  When it comes to my loved ones and my livestock I am extremely protective.  If by the third time the neighbor didn't control his dog he would not have to worry about it until his next one.  It probably sounds a bit extreme but anything gets at my livestock is hitting the dinner table. I won't kill something unless I'm going to eat it. Btw, dog is a fine meal 
    [/quote]

    Perfectly stated,
    I Might even quote you,
    I deal with a lot of dogs and owners .
     
  10. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Holts Summit, Missouri


    In an area like I live in you will devolve to step 3 frequently if no fencing is used. With each progression through the steps you will loose birds and create friction with neighboring dog owners. Law may be in your side, certainly is here, but laws and their enforcement have not kept up with changes in the dog keeping culture. If you keep the chickens for any length of time you will note that dog problems are not a once in a lifetime event.


    During the time I have plied this site, neighbors dogs have caused problems at least half dozen times. Twice I did your option three. Another time and a half my dogs did option 3 for me which was potentially more problematic. What really shut the problem down is the use of perimeter fencing. My dogs do most of their work outside that perimeter greatly increasing the safety of my chickens.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2017

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