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Advice please

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by clayb226, May 4, 2011.

  1. clayb226

    clayb226 Chillin' With My Peeps

    266
    2
    113
    Mar 31, 2011
    Missouri
    Hello,
    I set 24 eggs on 4/11, out of the 24, 13 made it to lock down. Out of the 13 7 hatched, and 6 did not. I started to tear into the remaining 6 eggs, after candling and float testing and no movement. I tore the open, and out of 6, 2 had not absorbed all the yolk, and the other 4, the yolk was totally asorbed. They were not shrink wrapped or anything. The only other option is they drowned, but there was a plenty big air sack. Tomorrow, I will be setting more, and would like to figure this out before this. I used wet incubation that route, next I am going the dry method. Any advice would be great.
     
  2. BeccaOH

    BeccaOH Morning Gem Farm

    Oct 3, 2008
    east central Ohio
    6 out of 13 is a pretty high percentage. I don't know, though.

    I hate to open unhatched eggs, so I generally don't. [​IMG] But I don't know what causes some chicks to get all the way and die before even pipping. Even when I want to cry with frustration, I guess I just have to trust that it is natures way.
     
  3. ScissorChick

    ScissorChick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 17, 2010
    Under Your bed
    Alright, I have been working on a little 'book' or 'help sheet' of my own, maybe theres somthing about
    my chickens that I may not be sure of, I'll look it up in my book. It's just a bunch of info that I've learned
    over the years, and alot is from this site.

    This is what I have ~

    Not pipped. Full-term embryo, large yolk sac; yolk sac may not be fully enclosed by abdominal wall, may have residual albumen.

    Causes:

    Inadequate turning, resulting in decreased embryonic membrane development and nutrient absorption.

    Humidity too high during incubation or after transfer.

    Incubator temperature too low.

    Hatcher temperature too high.

    Eggs chilled (at transfer).

    Nutritional deficiencies.

    Heredity.

    Embryological development accident.

    Breeder diseases.

    Inadequate ventilation.

    Prolonged egg storage.


    So sorry about your un-hatched babies [​IMG]
    But congrats on the ones that hatched! [​IMG]

    ~Scissor
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2011
  4. clayb226

    clayb226 Chillin' With My Peeps

    266
    2
    113
    Mar 31, 2011
    Missouri
    Quote:Awesome info, thank you so much. I would like to get a copy of your help sheet.
     
  5. ScissorChick

    ScissorChick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 17, 2010
    Under Your bed
    Here is the rest!

    Though I do have a file that -I- typed, and keep handy, this is actually a copy frm SOMWHERE, and
    I do not know where it came from. [​IMG] Just so everyone know it IS a copy.

    Eggs candle clear; broken out eggs show small white-dot germinal disc; no blood. Infertile.

    Causes

    Immature males. Males may need to be photostimulated 2 weeks earlier than females.

    Males with abnormal sperm; females with abnormal egg (germinal disc). This occurs most often in very young or very old breeders.

    Too few males, resulting in infrequent mating; too many males, resulting in fighting or interference. Ratios of 1:12 to 1:15 for light
    breeds and 1:10 to 1:12 for heavy breeds are suggested.

    Extreme weather conditions.

    Old breeders. Spiking with young males may help if the problem is with the male.

    Breeder flock disease. This is often indicated by rough, misshaped, or thin-shelled eggs.

    Excess body weight, especially in broiler breeder males (>4,800 g, 10.6 lb).

    Nutritional deficiencies or excesses; severe feed restriction.

    Feet and leg problems, especially in males of heavy breeds.

    Certain drugs, pesticides, chemicals, toxins, or mycotoxins.

    Parasites, such as mites.

    Inadequate floor space.

    Decreased mating frequency, or no mating, is commonly seen in many of the conditions listed above; this may often be the direct cause
    of infertility.

    Inadequate lighting (intensity or day length).

    Improper artificial insemination procedures (if artificial insemination is used).

    Eggs candle clear; broken out eggs show enlarged germinal disc; no blood. Fertile. Some are termed "blastoderm without embryo."

    Causes

    Eggs stored too long. They should be stored <7 days.

    Eggs held under poor conditions, temperature too high or too low. Fluctuating temperatures. Temperature should be 60° to 65°F (15.6° to 18.3°C).

    Fumigation improper -- too severe or done between 12 and 96 h of incubation. Incorrectly spraying or foaming eggs with disinfectant.

    Eggs damaged during handling and transport by jarring, temperature shock (temperature increased or decreased too rapidly), etc.

    Eggshell sealed -- respiration inhibited.

    High temperature in early incubation.

    Very young or very old breeders.

    Heredity, inbreeding, chromosome abnormalities, or parthenogenesis.

    Breeder flock diseases.

    Failure of a basic organ system to develop normally.

    Egg wash temperature too high.

    Egg-borne infections (e.g., salmonella).

    Drugs, toxins, pesticides, etc.

    Infrequent or incomplete egg collection.

    Eggs candle clear; broken out eggs show blood ring or small embryo that died before 3 days of incubation; no dark eye visible.

    Causes:

    Eggs stored too long or under improper temperature.

    Fumigation improper -- too severe or done between 12 and 96 h of incubation.

    High temperature in early incubation.

    Low temperature in early incubation.

    Eggs damaged during transport by jarring, etc.

    Breeder flock diseases.

    Old breeders.

    Embryological development accidents.

    Inbreeding, chromosome abnormalities.

    Severe nutritional deficiencies, e.g., biotin, vitamin A, copper, vitamin E, boron, or pantothenic acid.
    Frequently associated with a high incidence of infertility.

    Drugs, toxins, or pesticides.

    Contamination.

    Embryos less developed at oviposition, i.e., pre-endoderm or very early endoderm formation.

    Dead embryos; 3 to 6 days of incubation; yolk sac circulatory system present, embryo on left side, no egg tooth.

    Causes
    See causes 3.1-14

    Lack of ventilation, or sealed shells, carbon dioxide >1%.

    Improper turning -- <1/h or >6/h; improper turning angle.

    Vitamin deficiencies -- vitamin E, riboflavin, biotin, pantothenic acid, or linoleic acid.

    Dead embryos; 7 to 17 days of incubation; each embryo has egg tooth, toenails, feather follicles (8 days), feathers (11 days).

    Causes:
    Improper incubator temperature, humidity, turning, ventilation. Low humidity increases abnormalities of aortic arches (13 days).

    Contamination.

    Nutritional deficiencies -- riboflavin, vitamin B12, biotin, niacin, pyridoxine, pantothenic acid, phosphorus, boron, or linoleic acid.

    Lethal genes (>30 have been described).

    Dead embryos; >18 days of incubation.

    Causes:

    Improper incubator temperature, humidity, turning, ventilation.

    Improper hatcher temperature, humidity, ventilation.

    Contamination, especially from molds (aspergillis, etc.).

    Fumigation too severe or too prolonged.

    Eggs chilled in transfer, or transferred too late.

    Broken shell -- pre-set, during incubation, or at transfer.

    Nutritional deficiencies -- vitamin D, vitamin A, folic acid, or pantothenic acid, riboflavin, vitamin E, selenium, vitamin K, biotin, thiamin, vitamin B12, calcium, phosphorus, manganese, or linoleic acid.

    Embryonic malposition; embryo fails to move into proper hatching position (see #21).

    Embryological development accident. Failure to change to lung respiration and all intra-embryonic circulation, and/or to retract the intestinal loops and yolk sac. These and other changes are critical at this time.

    Heredity -- lethal genes, chromosome abnormalities.

    Twinning.

    Hatcher opened too much during pipping and hatching.

    Poor shell quality.

    Breeder diseases.

    Not pipped. Full-term embryo, large yolk sac; yolk sac may not be fully enclosed by abdominal wall, may have residual albumen.

    Causes:
    Inadequate turning, resulting in decreased embryonic membrane development and nutrient absorption.

    Humidity too high during incubation or after transfer.

    Incubator temperature too low.

    Hatcher temperature too high.

    Eggs chilled (e.g., at transfer).

    Nutritional deficiencies.

    Heredity.

    Embryological development accident.

    Breeder diseases.

    Inadequate ventilation.

    Prolonged egg storage.

    Pipped. Full-term embryo, dead in shell.

    Causes:
    Low humidity or temperature for a prolonged period.

    Low humidity during hatching.

    High temperature during hatching.

    Nutritional deficiencies.

    Breeder diseases.

    Poor ventilation.

    Inadequate turning during first 12 days.

    Injury during transfer.

    Prolonged egg storage.

    Shell partially pipped, embryo alive or dead.

    Causes:

    See 8.a-i.

    Excessive fumigation during hatching.

    Eggs set small end up.

    Chicks hatch early; tendency to be thin and noisy.

    Causes:

    Small eggs.

    Differences among breeds.

    Incubator temperature too high.

    Incubator humidity too low.

    Chicks hatch late.

    Causes:

    Large eggs.

    Old breeders.

    Eggs stored too long (40 min. increase in incubation time/day of storage, .5% to 1.2% decrease in number hatched/day of storage).

    Incubator temperature too low.

    Weak embryos.

    Inbreeding.

    Incubator humidity too high.

    Slow, protracted (drawn-out) hatch.

    Causes:

    Mix in the incubator of eggs stored for long and short periods (1.2% loss of hatch/day of storage when all eggs set at the same time; only .5% loss/day when eggs stored for long periods are set earlier to allow a longer incubation period).

    Mix of eggs from young and old breeders.

    Mix of large and small eggs.

    Improper egg handling.

    Hot or cold spots in incubator or hatcher.

    Incubator or hatcher temperature too high or too low.

    Room ventilation system improper; high positive pressure or low negative pressure. Such pressures may alter incubator or hatcher ventilation.

    Trays not uniform in hatch or chick quality.

    Causes:

    Mix of large and small eggs.

    Mix of eggs from young and old breeders.

    Mix of eggs from different strains or breeds.

    Some eggs stored much longer.

    Lack of uniform ventilation in setter or hatcher.

    Disease or other stress in one or more breeder flocks.

    Variation in egg storage procedures among flocks.

    Sticky chicks; chicks smeared with albumen.

    Causes:
    Low incubation temperature.

    High incubation humidity.

    Improper turning. This results in reduced embryonic membrane growth and reduced nutrient absorption.

    Old eggs.

    Very large eggs.

    Chicks stuck in shell, dry; chicks with shell fragments stuck to down feathers.

    Causes:

    Humidity too low during egg storage, incubation, and/or hatching.

    Improper egg turning.

    Cracked eggs or poor shell quality.

    Premature hatching; bloody navels.

    Causes:

    Incubator and/or hatcher temperature too high.

    Small chicks

    Causes:

    Small eggs.

    Low humidity during egg storage and/or incubation.

    High incubation temperature.

    High altitude. Hatcheries at high altitudes (>1,500 m or 4,920 ft) may need to adjust for low humidity, carbon dioxide, and oxygen.
    Atmospheric pressure <600 mmHg (~1,830 m or 6,004 ft) reduces growth and metabolic rate, increases loss of water from the egg.

    Thin, porous shells.

    Unhealed navel; dry, rough down feathers.

    Causes:

    High incubator temperature or wide fluctuations in temperature.

    Low temperature in hatcher.

    Humidity too high in hatcher or not lowered when hatching complete.

    Inadequate breeder nutrition.

    Unhealed navel, wet, odorous; mushy, large, soft-bodied, and lethargic chick.

    Causes:
    Omphalitis (navel infection). Contamination from dirty trays, unsanitary machines or hatchery, dirty eggs, inadequate egg sanitation or fumigation.

    Low incubator temperature.

    High incubator or hatcher humidity.

    Inadequate ventilation.

    Weak chicks.

    Causes:

    High hatcher temperature.

    Poor hatcher ventilation.

    Excessive fumigation.

    Contamination.

    Chicks malpositioned. Normal position after 19 days of incubation: embryo's long axis same as long axis of egg; head in large end of egg; head to the right and under right wing; beak toward air cell; feet toward head.

    Causes:

    Eggs set small end up or in horizontal position.

    Inadequate or improper turning.

    High or low incubator temperature.

    High humidity.

    Old breeders.

    Round-shaped eggs or very large eggs.

    Nutritional deficiencies, especially vitamin A and vitamin B12.

    Eggs handled or stored improperly.

    Retarded development.

    Embryos <18 days old may be in a position different from that for hatching but one normal for their age (for example, the head-between-thighs position). The feet-over-head position is hard to distinguish and may be normal. The beak-over-wing position is probably a normal variant. Some malpositions are lethal; others are not.

    Malformations.

    Causes:

    Improper egg storage.

    Jarring of eggs or transporting large end down.

    Heredity.

    Nutritional deficiencies, e.g., biotin, riboflavin, zinc, or manganese.

    Inadequate turning.

    Improper egg orientation, e.g., small end up.

    High or low incubator temperature.

    Breeder diseases.

    Inadequate ventilation or shells with low porosity or permeability.

    Crooked toes, spraddled legs.

    Causes:

    High or low incubator temperature.

    Inadequate nutrition.

    Smooth bottom hatching trays.

    Short down, wiry down.

    Causes:

    Nutritional deficiencies, especially riboflavin.

    Mycotoxins and other toxic or inhibitory substances, resulting in nutritional deficiencies.

    High incubation temperature during days 1 to 14.

    Eyes closed, down stuck to eyes.

    Causes:

    Temperature too high in hatcher.

    Humidity too low in hatcher.

    Down collectors inadequate.

    Chicks remain in hatcher too long after hatching

    Excessive air movement in hatcher.

    Exploders.

    Causes:

    Dirty eggs from nest. Dirty nests.

    Floor eggs.

    Eggs improperly washed; eggs wiped or cleaned with contaminated cloth or buffer.

    Dust from breeder house, cooler, transport, etc.

    Water condensation on eggs (sweating).

    Water sprayed, fogged, or splashed on eggs; eggs dipped in contaminated solutions.

    Contamination from earlier exploders, leakers, or broken eggs.

    Contamination from handling eggs with dirty hands or equipment.

    Contaminated setter flats, air filters, water (humidity) system.

    Dwarf embryos: runts in growing chicks.

    Causes:

    Egg contamination.

    Hatchery contamination, especially during hatching.

    Breeder diseases.

    Heredity.

    Nutritional deficiencies.

    Thyroid abnormalities.

    Crossed beak, twisted beak.

    Causes:

    Heredity.

    Missing eye(s), other eye abnormalities.

    Causes:

    High incubator temperature during days 1 to 6.

    Low oxygen during days 1 to 6.30.

    Exposed brain.

    Causes:

    High incubator temperature during days 1 to 3.

    Low oxygen during days 1 to 3.

    Red hocks in hatched chicks or unhatched pips.

    Causes:

    Prolonged pushing on shell during pipping and hatching.

    Vitamin deficiencies.

    Thick shells, as in pullet flocks.

    High incubator humidity and/or low incubator temperature.

    Small air cell, broad pip area, membrane incompletely cut, red hocks, edematous chick, unabsorbed albumen, yolk incompletely retracted, egg weight loss <10%.

    Causes:

    High incubator humidity.

    Very thick shells, as in pullet flocks.

    Low incubator temperature.

    Micromelia (shortened long bones, parrot beak, bent bones); chondrodystrophy (similar to micromelia).

    Causes:

    Heredity, lethal genes.

    Nutritional deficiencies (biotin or manganese).

    Short beak, missing beak, face abnormalities.

    Causes:

    Incubator temperature too high during days 1 to 5.

    Heredity, lethal genes.

    Developmental accidents.

    Nutritional deficiencies (niacin).


    Ectopic (exposed) viscera.

    Causes:

    Incubator temperature too high.

    Heredity, lethal genes.

    Hemorrhage.

    Causes:

    Red skin -- incubator or hatcher temperature too high.

    Bleeding in chorioallantois -- rough handling at transfer.

    Nutritional deficiencies (vitamin K or vitamin E).

    Embryos that died at days 11 to 15 and appear small and dark red -- usually caused by molds or other contamination.

    Swollen head and back of neck (exudative diathesis - increased capillary permeability).

    Causes:

    Nutritional deficiencies -- vitamin E or selenium.



    Happy Hatching!
     
  6. clayb226

    clayb226 Chillin' With My Peeps

    266
    2
    113
    Mar 31, 2011
    Missouri
    Quote:Thanks you, I have copied it to my system.
     

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