Aftermath of a serious Coyote attack

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by chickenmomma16, Mar 20, 2015.

  1. chickenmomma16

    chickenmomma16 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm pretty sure if the attack was any worse I would have just culled my her. I was probably 2 days away from doing it anyway because I figured she broke her pelvis or hip area but she showed significant improvement (as in being able to walk without falling over) so almost 6 weeks later I still have her. She is walking around and back with the flock but does not roost yet and still walks with a limp but I have seen her scratch when she is out free ranging. Her energy is still down, and now she's molting so that's not helping.

    The problem I am having is it looks like the holes where her feathers should be are very infected. One hole in particular is oozing thick puss and she doesn't smell too good. It is on the underside of her body to the R side. Other than keeping it clean any thought on what to do? I have some triple antibiotic ointment I will put on it. Are their safe antibiotics given orally or SQ that are safe for chickens? I have an old country semi-retired Veterinarian just around the corner that I might be able to get something from if needed.


    You can see doesn't feel too good. Poor girly!
    [​IMG]


    There are 3 holes that look bad but the worst one you can barley see. It is to the Left of the 2 that are easily seen. The skin all around and under her leg is hard, misshapen, and very yellow. Will this get better?
    [​IMG]
     
  2. SilkieNation

    SilkieNation Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Looks like infection. (Is the yellow skin normal?? I have Silkies who have black skin, so I wouldn't know.) The odor says a lot. Antibiotic ointment is likely not going to do it. My opinion is that you need oral antibiotics from a vet. It's easy to administer, you just have to be careful not to let her aspirate. I've done it a number of times without any problems, but the risk exists to squirt the liquid into the trachea. You can do some quick research, probably on this forum, and find more detail on the location of the trachea in relation to the throat and how to avoid aspiration.

    I recently had a sick hen. I gently wrapped her in a towel and sat her upright on my lap, then gently opened her beak and carefully administered very small amounts onto her tongue, making sure she swallowed between each dose. Your girl may feel sick and weak because of the infection as much as anything else. Look for a vet clinic that has an avian vet on staff, if possible. Sometimes farm vets are okay. Even clinics with emergency services that see all sorts of animals including exotics may have vets on staff with some avian experience. If you have none of these around then just go to a regular vet and get some medicine. If you give her antibiotics, don't eat her eggs (if she laying) for a while (I don't know how long that would be) and be sure to give her the entire course of medication. Good luck!
     
  3. chickenmomma16

    chickenmomma16 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I will try and find a vet. I just had an information overload reading Casportpony's posts on antibiotics. [​IMG] I was hoping to not get a vet involved but I may just have too. I'm sure the vet around he corner has something. Otherwise I'm looking at a 30min drive to the nearest office. And withdraw is not a problem, I don't expect eggs from her for a month or 2 while she molts.
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I would get some epsom salts and give her a warm soak daily to the infected area. Those holes needto be irrigated with a syringe and hydrogen peroxide or weakened betadine. You can then apply plain Neosporin or other antibiotic ointment. A vet will have better antibiotics such as clavamox, clindamycin, baytril or others, but the feed stores have penicillin and Gallimycin. Your neighbor may be of help since he probably knows a lot about treating an abscess.
     
  5. SilkieNation

    SilkieNation Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well, antibiotics have their place and than god we have them. If you assess that her infection has progressed beyond just a few feather holes (or whatever you call them!), and you think it is becoming more widespread, then antibiotics may ultimately save her life. Do make sure you run the full course though. Antibiotics become dangerous when they are overused or stopped before the full course is given, which can result in resistant bacteria. But, if the yellow skin is not normal, then it seems she's got a real problem. Are you sure that the yellow is not on the exterior of her skin, maybe old pus that has oozed from the wounds? You might try very warm compresses, they can help to draw the pus out from the punctures and if the yellow is pus etc. on her skin, they will soften it and you'll be able to clean it off. I'd say make a solution of salt water for the compresses, but unless the wounds are closed over, the salt would be very painful given they are deep puncture wounds.
     
  6. enola

    enola Overrun With Chickens

    I am sure he will help you get the punctures drained. They need to be opened and thoroughly cleaned. They need to heal from the inside out. She is going to need antibiotics, either in the form of a shot or a measured dose orally. I don't think antibiotics in drinking water will get her a large enough dose quickly enough.
     
  7. SilkieNation

    SilkieNation Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Great advice. Didn't know you could buy antibiotics in the store without a script. I'd go with betadine though. Hydrogen peroxide is not for deep punctures. A soak would be much better than the compresses - absolutely. However, I'm really am wondering if the yellow isn't on the exterior. If you look closely at the picture, you can see some of it on the base of her feathers. It's hard to tell.
     

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