aggressive chick! normal?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by smcdermott, Feb 15, 2015.

  1. smcdermott

    smcdermott Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi all.
    My 1 Rhode Island red is VERY aggressive with all of the younger chicks. I have been trying to integrate them slowly. They are only about 4 weeks apart.
    We have started letting the 2 groups out in the yard at the same time. They still primarily stick to their own groups but the RIR will go out of its way to chase and peck at the little ones.
    Is this normal pecking order? When they were in a cage it was easier to peck it on the head when it happened. But out in the yard I can never get close enough. I am ready to get rid of it. Not sure yet if it's a roo or hen.
     
  2. song of joy

    song of joy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How old is the RIR compared to the younger chicks?
     
  3. smcdermott

    smcdermott Chillin' With My Peeps

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    There is a 4 week difference. The RIR is about 6 weeks and the babies are about 2 1/2 weeks. We are in FL and really warm. They all love to peck around in the yard. Except this 1chicken.
     
  4. RoosterCogburn7

    RoosterCogburn7 Chicken Atlas Farm NPIP 74-4231 Premium Member

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    I have found that even brooder chicks can be aggressive. When I got my 7 EE's the other 6 ganged up on it. I tried to rescue it, nurse it back to life, but eventually it expired. That is why I have 6 EE's.
     
  5. DanEP

    DanEP Chillin' With My Peeps

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    4 weeks can be a lot of difference at that age. You will have to watch them for awhile, letting them out together will help but I wouldn't try housing them together for awhile till your sure they get along well. As far as the RIR goes she may be just mean or on the bottom of the pecking order of the older chicks. I have noticed that the lower ranking girls are the one's that tend to be the roughest on the baby's. If that's the case she may lighten up once she thinks she has established her dominance over them. If not I'd get rid of her. I have noticed that a lot of RIR tend to be kind of mean to the other girls that's why I no longer have any. To me the few eggs I could get from her isn't worth all the fighting all the time and the other girls seem to lay better when it's peaceful.
     
  6. song of joy

    song of joy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    There's quite a big difference in size/strength between 2 1/2 and 6 weeks. I'd recommend keeping them separated but able to see each other for at least 3 more weeks to give the younger ones more time to gain size and strength. Then combine them and monitor carefully.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2015
  7. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    My Coop
     
  8. Urban Flock

    Urban Flock Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Good Advice. At 2 1/2 they are not big enough to defend themselves. I would keep them separate for another 4-5 weeks to let the little ones get some size on them. Then try again to introduce the two flocks.
    It the mean one still causes problems you may have to decide what is best for the flock. Sometimes removing the cranky one for a few days will work. Best of luck to youi.
     
  9. smcdermott

    smcdermott Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok so, I couldn't stand the mean one anymore so I took her back where I got her and they took her without a problem.
    Before I had left I let all the chickens out to roam. Came home and both groups. The big and little ones were in the big cage curled up together. Without the mean big one, they are getting along so much better.
     

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