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Aggressive Cockerel

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by katiexwilliams, Aug 5, 2013.

  1. katiexwilliams

    katiexwilliams New Egg

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    Aug 5, 2013
    We have a pretty Rhode Island Red cockerel which we hatched and raised. He used to fall asleep on your lap when he was a chick.
    Recently however, he has become a tad aggressive, but mainly on my Green pair of wellingtons which I wear when I got out to feed the hens. I'll turn my back to him or walk past him and he will attack the Wellingtons, and have a face off with them. Before I have ignored it but now it is becoming a regular occurrence.
    He has previously jumped up at my mums back and had jumped up at my legs which does hurt as he is very heavy! We have to use a broom to keep him at a distance from us. He also goes though a stage of attacking the broom, when I am not wearing those wellingtons.

    Can anyone recommend any solutions to calm him down and stop him attacking. I have an 8 year old brother and our cockerel has huge Spurs and the last thing I want is for him to get hurt.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2013
  2. If your willing to catch him and hold him every day then you may see a change in behavior. If a rooster will go through the motions of spurring you every day then he will always think he can, and will continue. RIR Roosters are great. However the can be hard to handle for many. If he was more of a pet and held (or manhandled if you will) each day this does effect how they treat you.

    All that being said. A continual aggressive roo is good for one thing......Dinner.

    Wish ya the best.
     
  3. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    Get rid of the cockerel immediately!!!!

    Seriously they can damage eyes as well as other areas. There are nice cock birds out there and it isn't worth the danger. Hold out for a nice one.
     
  4. katiexwilliams

    katiexwilliams New Egg

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    Aug 5, 2013
    @ Chick Charm
    I'll see if I can pick him up regularly, however he is very big and very heavy! I remember once I went to stroke him and he turned around and tried to attack me. I have been going out with the broom by my side and ignoring him and he has not done much yet. He actually ate out of my hand so perhaps he was just a bit grumpy?

    @ ChickensAreSweet
    Oh I'm not sure if we could just get rid of him, I think we will just see how he is for a few more weeks and then decide. It's hard to get rid of him as we hatched him and watched him grow up. :/
     
  5. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    He's not grumpy, he's a rooster, it's just their nature. He will continue to come at you when the mood strikes. My RIR started up with that baloney when the hormones hit, about 6 or 9 months old and continued until he was a little over a year old. During that time I carried a rake or broom with me and when he'd come at me I went right after him and chased him away from the coop. I didn't allow him back to the barn and the hens until I was good and ready. I didn't ever initiate, I only respond when he made a move. When I'm in the barn, I don't move out of his space or around him, he moves out of my way. The whole point was for him to learn that I am top dog, not him, the hens are mine, and that he better respect my space. It took a few times but he got the idea and settled down. He is now respectful of my space and does not attack. He is still protective of his hens and when I need to handle them I lock him in the run since he gets upset if they squawk when I pick them up.

    The thing is, every person who is around your rooster is going to need to work with him if you are wanting to keep him. Otherwise he will attack anyone that he does not respect. Young kids are at greatest risk, it's hard for them to keep a close eye on a rooster and know from body language that they are going to attack. My rule at my house is that rooster and small kids don't mix. Roosters can do a lot of damage when they jump up and sink those spurs in. I had a rooster spur me right through my jeans once, went right into my leg. That hurt like the devil!

    You might seriously consider trimming back your roosters spurs. We clip them back short and then file them so they are round and smooth.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2013

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