Aggressive Roo

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Etw321, Feb 9, 2013.

  1. Etw321

    Etw321 Out Of The Brooder

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    Hello All!

    I need some advice on taming my roo. Henry is almost a year old and is a French Standard Black Copper Maran. With the first two hens that we had (Barred Rocks), he was a complete sweetheart that would let you carry him around, he acted like a dog, and quite frankly was not interested in the hens at all. After the hens were killed by hawks, we replaced our old girls with 4 new lady friends (2 Comets/2 NH Reds), all of whom Henry is VERY fond of. After the intro to the girls, Henry was a bit more protective (understandably) but still not aggressive... He still thought he was a dog so much to the point that he'd sit at the back door every morning and wait for his breakfast.

    Within the past few months however, he has become increasingly aggressive but only towards me. Whenever my boyfriend goes in the coop he's able to pick Henry up and be around him without fear of attack. I on the other hand seem to be his favorite target. Even when feeding the chickens, Henry seems to think it's time to fight or attack.

    I've begun carrying a broom into the run every time I go to change out the water or to feed the babies for fear that Henry with come after me. I don't want to kill him because he has kept egg production up for my girls this winter season, but he's been so testy lately that I don't know what to do. Does anyone have any advice on how to tame the beast?


    [​IMG] <--- Henry the cold blooded killer/Attack Roo
     
  2. TimBaumann

    TimBaumann Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi

    I thinks it's probably his hormones that cause him to act this way. Taming a rooster that is aggressive can be very hard and sometimes not possible at all. Especially if the rooster doesn't want to be picked up or touched he might not become tame at all. To stop the aggressive behavior you should either pick him up each time he attacks you (If he hates being picked up) or push him down on the ground (Not too hard otherwise he could get hurt). This shows him that you are dominant and in control. As for the taming part I guess after you've worked the aggressiveness out of him you can use treats to try and tame him. I personally like aggressive roosters but only if they are aggressive to everyone and other animals, not just one person. That way you can be sure that he will protect his hens.
    Good luck!

    P.S Beautiful rooster! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2013
  3. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Having a rooster doesn't effect egg production, so you don't need to keep him for that. Hens lay quite well without a rooster, just as a human woman ovulates without a man around.

    My tolerance for mean roosters is zero. There's no way on earth I'm going to be afraid of anything on my own property--human, horse, dog, and absolutely not a ten pound bird. In my experience once they start going for you, they're not to be trusted. You might get them to back off for a week or so, but you'll never be able to turn your back on him with confidence. Ever.

    So, my advice is to invite him to dinner.
     
  4. Chambertin

    Chambertin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I always reccomend the same therapy, The Flip
    Pushing them around and holding them does work, but it also continues the will to fight. They see it as a form of fighting and they didnt really lose they just got stopped. When I did the push down method with the boys they would snap back up the next day and try again, as they seem to do in nature.
    If I picked them up and carried them it was a little more permanent, but they would always tray again.
    So to let them know I am solidly in charge I carry them around by their feet for a while just like you were taking them to market. It doesnt hurt them, they will calm down after 1 initial attempt to fly and they cant or wont hurt you.

    It shouldnt take more than 1 week of flipping them at EVERY aggressive gesture to show them that you are in charge and you wont hurt them if they stay in line.

    Note, they will try to flap and rite themselves, but they wont hurt you. They will move and squirm like its hurting them but its no worse than being pushed down. Simply take the other hand on their keel (breast bone) and push them straight so they hang straight down. They'll calm down and just kind of hang like that thinking about how much it sucks to be at a complete loss.
    If it was a minor transgression I'll flip them back and hold them a sec then release them gently. Dont let go until they calm down.
    If they really attacked with a good bite, or a kick, then hold them upside down till you tire of it.

    If this doesnt improve their attitude, then make soup.

    My roo still really likes me even as his breeding season hormones come in. To be honest I think he respects me more in chicken land. My mother in law didnt do the flip and he will peck her and attack her all the time. You have to show them who is boss and cant be afraid of them, if you are afraid and get close to the girls, then he'll go after you as you might be a threat.

    Roosters need to be shown why they should respect you, its an unfortunate part of chickin wiring. Dont fight, dominate and respect.

    My boy is still freindly enough that he'll jump on my shoulder and have a nap when its free time in the house, but if you dont make him respect you he'll just fight you every day.
    Be consistant, and be strong, or make chicken soup and be full.
    [​IMG]
    A picture of him zoning out ( I wasnt cute enough so PePe got stuffed in the hood)

    [​IMG]
    Him on the job.


    EDIT: It might take a little more than a week for an older guy, but dont give up and always catch and flip him.
    Of 4 roosters we have had it worked well on all of them. (even though one had to go, just too many boys)
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2013
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  5. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    He very often will get worse, he has lost his fear of humans, and wants to be dominant. This is a hormonal thing, and they have a very small brain, so reasoning is not a strong trait. I belong to the camp that does not make a pet out of a roo, making a pet out of them, they lose their fear of humans, and then often become aggressive.

    If he is attacking you, he could very easily do serious damage to any child that might come into contact. Perhaps you think that there is no possible children coming in contact, but sometimes a grandchild of a neighbor shows up, or someone has to change a tire and a kid wanders off.....even if a kid is NOT suppose to be there, should they be permanently scarred as a punishment?

    What I am saying is that an aggressive roo is dangerous, really dangerous. He can cause severe damage to people. I would get rid of him and get a nice roo. One that is a little bit afraid of you.

    MrsK
     
  6. Chambertin

    Chambertin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You may be right, but my truth is they were never afraid of humans, only that specific human.
    Roosters will qucikly and without fear attack a dog, when the house dog is a close friend.

    The relationship comes from the trust that you wont hurt his girls and you are higher on the totem pole, maybe even part of the flock in his eyes.
    A child, a bulldozer, a machette weilding alien, dont matter if he percieves it as even a slight threat invading his space he will attack it.
    If you treat him with respect and he goes at you anway, then try to train him, if he doesnt respond he's dangerous.
    As I said, when training doesnt work then make soup, afterall mean tastes good.

    I completely agree that a kid shouldnt be scarred for seeing a rooster, but a rooster wont attack (99% of the time) unless you invade his space and he is almost guarenteed to attack if you come out of nowhere and try to catch his girls no matter how scary the farmer is. If the rooster doesnt attack, its not fear, its understanding that people wont hurt his girls.

    Honestly kids are the most dangerous thing on the farm, in the eyes of the animals, they are loud, unperdictable, unusual, and often completely undiciplined. They usually need more management than anything else on a farm unless they grew up there. That may be painful to hear for many, but cuteness matters not to livestock, and machinery.

    EDIT: I'm on the fence about the pet issue. The family does think of him that way, but if he goes bad hes dinner in a flash. Yes he get treated well, but in my mind him roosting on my shoulder is no different than when the boys roost next to each other, our two hodans roosted next to each other and the silkies still do. He just needs to get up higher to be eye to eye with me. (and its kinda fun to have him be nice) He gets a chance to come in the house once a month or less and just likes to say hello to his big brother when the girls arent looking.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2013
  7. mstricer

    mstricer Overrun With Chickens

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    Marans are quite tasty, just saying incase you can't tame him. ;)
     
  8. CLOUDNINE

    CLOUDNINE Out Of The Brooder

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    So if you have a rooster coming at you with spurs, how do you get a hold of the booger? I have one that most times will be ok, but he has gotten more aggressive this winter, and seems to have people he will tolerate, but others not at all. He used to only show aggression to my 15 yr old son, and once to me- now it's to me as well as my 15 yr old. I don't have my other sons help with the chickens anymore because I don't want them hurt too, and the 15 yr old doesn't help anymore either. My husband can go in the run with the rooster and he causes no problem, but I watch him like a hawk every time I feed them and I'm the only one that does feed them!

    He's a yr old so I'm thinking I might need a pressure cooker to make him edible ;) Of course, I still would have to catch him!
     
  9. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I could never figure that out, either, when folks go on about "just catch him and carry him around". Catch WHAT? A handful of spurs? No thanks! I have quite strong self-preservation instincts and my body tries hard to avoid injury.

    To catch him for butchering, go in at night and take him off the roost. Keep the coop as dark as you can, and I often toss a towel over the roo for added protection. You can then put him in a small dog kennel, etc. When you're ready to process, put on some good gloves and just be quick and steady, I grab a leg and flip them upside down as quick as I can, then have a helper hold the wings and cover the head. Covering their head helps quiet them down a lot, usually.

    Crockpot will still do well for that bad boy! A little wine to help soften the meat, some veggies...or pick the meat and make enchiladas!
     
  10. CLOUDNINE

    CLOUDNINE Out Of The Brooder

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    I hear your self preservation! Me too!! LOL

    I will keep your recommendations in mind regarding processing and the crock pot and wine [​IMG]
     

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