air sack rupture

WingedD20

In the Brooder
May 25, 2017
13
17
46
I have a speckled Sussex that is about a week over a month old I have been trying to give my hens a once over infrequently to keep an eye on there health. Yesterday I was looking under her wings and noticed a pair of air filled pockest just under the skin at the base and underside of the wings.
upload_2017-5-25_23-30-4.jpeg

its hard to see in this image but there is a small pocket around about that white feather that isn't fully formed yet. Look up and to your right of the 3 black quills low and to your left of her bald patch. This one inflates and deflates with each breath.
upload_2017-5-25_23-37-2.jpeg

My search suggests that this is subcutaneous emphysema from some minor injury. Other then this she seems to be fine as far as I can tell. I'm currently just planning on letting her be for a week or two. I kind of figure I should let the inside heal up before letting the air out as it will probably just fill up again.

I'm would like to know if any of you have had something similar on any of your chickens and if I should poke through the larger one to let the air drain out or just let it be. The fact that that large vain goes over one of these pockets worries me but so does infection.
 

Glenda Heywoodo

Songster
Dec 19, 2016
1,007
144
126
Cassville Missouri
http://www.birdtrader.co.uk/bird-advice/emergency-care-for-birds-air-sac-rupture/507
Emergency Care for Birds: Air sac rupture
ArticleBird Advice•Thursday 10 November 2011
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image_507.jpg


First Aid Kit
Air sacs are located inside the neck, chest and belly. When ruptured, air will leak from the sac and accumulate under the bird's skin. If air is not released, the tear in the sac will enlarge.

The vet or you can disinfect the ruptured skin and with a sterile needle gently prick the area to allow the air to escape.

Repeat if necessary (surgical repair / antibiotic therapy may be necessary).
Budgerigars may rupture their air sacs by flying into windows or the result of a heavy landing.

A startled bird due to night fright bird may damage their air sacs and do so much more damage so be prepared and always have a low wattage night light for your bird/s.

A swollen area along the breast which when held feels very spongy and may even emit a crackling noise when touched is certainly an air sac rupture

Gas under the skin or Subcutaneous Emphysema as it is normally called is the air that penetrates the subcutaneous tissues as the result of damage to part of the respiratory system.

This can be alarming for the owner when the bird blows up into a grotesque shape within a few hours.

Once access of air is stopped, however, the gases are slowly absorbed.

parrot%20air%20sac%20rupture%20004.jpg

This cock suffers from an air sac rupture but at the time this picture was taken he just appears to be fat, on another day he can be twice as bloated.

Source: Avian Web





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WingedD20

In the Brooder
May 25, 2017
13
17
46
well I do have rubbing alcohol and needles on hand but should I take action or just wait and see how she recovers without intervention for a few days? So far the problem doesn't seem to be getting worse.
 

Eggcessive

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Premium Feather Member
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Apr 3, 2011
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southern Ohio
I treated a 2 week old chick once who had injured herself by removing the air with a 22 Gauge needle, but her whole right side was puffed from a leaking air sac. If yours is not looking distressed, I would leave her alone, and let the air reabsorb by itself. However, if the leak becomes much larger and is causing respiratory distress, then I would intervene. An 18 gauge needle is ideal, but I used a smaller one and had to puncture several areas. The air sometimes re-accumulates, and this has to be done more than once.
 

WingedD20

In the Brooder
May 25, 2017
13
17
46
Right thanks. That was the plan but I wanted a second opinion. No apparent change in her condition so far.
 

Mechanicor

In the Brooder
Apr 10, 2018
11
23
32
Cary, Illinois
Question one of my chickens looks bloated and I believe this is the problem. When should you make the call to assist? She appears normal aside from what looks like a golf ball under her feathers and moving her head and neck from side to side from occasion.
 

Eggcessive

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Apr 3, 2011
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southern Ohio
Question one of my chickens looks bloated and I believe this is the problem. When should you make the call to assist? She appears normal aside from what looks like a golf ball under her feathers and moving her head and neck from side to side from occasion.
Where is the “golf ball” and does it feel hard or soft, or puffy? Is the skin thin there? Can you identify the crop? It sounds like the hen is adjusting her crop.
 

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