All duck eggs have small air cells. Help!

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by CannysChicks, Apr 6, 2017.

  1. CannysChicks

    CannysChicks Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 22, 2017
    Northern Colorado
    I've read some stuff about other people seeming to have the same issue as me, the eggs not losing enough moisture. My darn incubator is not helping that though. I open the lid and get the humidity to drop down but, as soon as I put the lid back on it jumps right back up to 65%! I drained all the water out from the channels and removed the sponges I had in the incubator. Also, my eggs are at day 20 right now, so they need to lose moisture ASAP! [​IMG]

    In my desperate need to get the humidity to stay down, I've put rice in paper towels and tied the ends up. Should this help? Is this too dangerous? I'm also only spraying them once a day. Should I start spraying them two or three times a day? My incubator also doesn't have a vent I can open so, I propped the lid open with a piece of paper towel. Will this be okay? [​IMG]
    It doesn't seem to be effecting the temperature, and with it like this the humidity dropped to 40-45%. Should that be okay? Would adding rice to the water channels help?

    Now the second problem I have, is on the left side of the above picture you can see that I have more eggs in the other side of the turner; those eggs are at day 8 right now. Is the humidity being that low too dangerous for those eggs or, will they be okay?

    Sorry there's so many questions. This is my fourth time trying to hatch ducklings but, none of my previous hatching's have been successful. I'm super desperate to have this one work, please help. [​IMG]

    P.S. They are all Indian Runner eggs except for the one black one, that's a Cayuga.
     
  2. Pyxis

    Pyxis Hatchaholic Extrordinaire Premium Member

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    You should have your humidity at around 40% normally for duck eggs, maybe even lower, so keep it there. Personally I would ditch the paper towel thing and actually put some holes in that incubator in the lid if it has no vents. It looks like it's one of the cheap ones from China so I'm not surprised it has that design flaw. You really need vents for multiple reasons, humidity control being one, and fresh oxygen getting to the eggs being the other. So if it has no ventilation holes, put two or three in. You could always cover them up with tape when needed.

    Misting is good, it'll help them lose moisture. Keep that up. Maybe take the turner rack out when you spray them so the water doesn't go into the incubator and just boost the humidity back up.
     
  3. CannysChicks

    CannysChicks Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 22, 2017
    Northern Colorado
    How big should I make the ventilation holes?
     
  4. Pyxis

    Pyxis Hatchaholic Extrordinaire Premium Member

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    They don't need to be huge, maybe the width of a pencil or so. You'd be surprised how much that will help.
     
  5. CannysChicks

    CannysChicks Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 22, 2017
    Northern Colorado
    Okay, thank you so much for the help! Do you think it'll be okay if I cool and spray them a few times a day, as well?
     

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