Am I colorblind? (Blue Egg laying Breeds)

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Double Barrel, Feb 13, 2017.

  1. Double Barrel

    Double Barrel Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm starting to think my eyes are failing me. I see all these eggs advertised as "Real", "True", "Sky", "Baby"...all these different adjectives to describe these Blue eggs. Then pictures show GREEN eggs. Not Blue![/color=blue] No matter what adjective is used to describe them. They look green to me!..lol.

    Do these people see blue? Is it like that crazy dress picture that people were arguing over the colors? Do they really see blue? Does their minds see it that way?

    ....or are they green? I've saw sage, mint, olive, light, dark..even some Blue-ish greens.

    Are they advertising as such because Blue is in demand and/or preferred for these particular breeds?

    I can't say every add, site and pic is this way. I have seen some that really look BLUE...to me. The averages aren't that good though..haha .. Then they may even be accused of doctoring the pic or using fake ceramic eggs.

    I really haven't ever had a problem seeing colors. Other than that dress pic that was circulating a couple years ago. I honestly don't think that's it, but I'm not going to rule it out just yet. Seeing how many people seem to think they have blue eggs.

    I understand there are different shades of every color. But green is green. Not that it's even a bad thing. I like greens..lol. I just don't like Reading "Blue" and seeing "Green."

    I have just recently gotten the colored egg bug. Green and different shades thereof are on the "to get" or "to breed for" list. I'm not bashing the color at all. Blue doesn't seem to be so easy.

    Is there a "True" Blue egg laying breed?
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2017
  2. QuackSpeak

    QuackSpeak Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG] Lol
    Hope you figure this out!
     
  3. Double Barrel

    Double Barrel Out Of The Brooder

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    Haha..Thanks!
    Don't leave. I'm really not that crazy.
     
  4. QuackSpeak

    QuackSpeak Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Lol. I'm actually not a chicken owner, which is why I can't really help you. But why don't you post a picture of a green looking chicken egg (that's advertised as blue). Maybe I can help you!
     
  5. Double Barrel

    Double Barrel Out Of The Brooder

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    Good idea. I wasn't going to, for fear someone may take offense. I tried to crop, just to show color of these two Blue egger adds recently posted for sale. One looks blue to me, the other...well you decide.

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  6. TheKindaFarmGal

    TheKindaFarmGal Chicken Obsessed

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    I know from experience that it is hard to get a picture of blue eggs that accurately portrays the color. I have both blue and green egg laying chickens. One hen lays the most beautiful truly sky blue eggs, but in a picture they look whitish or a little green.

    In the first picture, those are definitely blue eggs. In the second picture, the eggs do look green, but it's possible they are blue (I'm seeing a little blue green) and it's just the lighting. That's a bad quality photo in indoor lighting.

    In most cases, though, I think it really is green eggs and people are just thinking it qualifies as blue. If an egg is borderline blue/green I think people tend to go with blue. Just my take!
     
  7. dheltzel

    dheltzel Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Photos lie. Even well intentioned photographers seldom capture reality with shades of blue. It doesn't help that different people see colors differently. Not even considering red-green color blindness.

    I keep a number of different strains of blue egg layers (6 strains of Ameraucanas, 2 strains of Legbars, plus some of my own hybrids). The bluest eggs, by far, are the lightest in color, the least saturated. I see that all the time in my hybrids to a productive white egg layer (white production leghorns, Barred Hollands, or California Greys). Those hybrids lay *lots* of light blue eggs with very little brown color to turn them greenish. Leghorns are known to carry brown suppressing genes and they certainly do "blue up" the eggs, but they also reduce the amount of blue. If a light sky blue is your goal, get a hybrid bred for that. But I find those eggs look more and more white as they get further into the lay cycle. They lay so much, they simply run low on blue pigments. The brown suppressing gene seems to also reduce the blue as well.

    I prefer that more saturated blue of the non-hybrids. Having 2 copies of the blue egg gene, and perhaps a hint of brown left in the eggs makes them much prettier, IMO. I like having both sky blue and turquoise in my egg collections. I sell chicks and very commonly sell both egg types together because my customers like the diversity.

    Incidentally, of all my true breeding (non hybrid) strains, the winners for sky blue are the Silver Ameraucanas. They wow me every time I gather eggs. I don't know if they have some of those brown suppressing genes, or if they brown has just been bred out more completely. It doesn't hurt that the pullets are very docile and friendly (almost to a fault, they sometimes "dive bomb" me from the roosts, they are so happy to see me in their pen).
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. duluthralphie

    duluthralphie Chicken Wrangler Premium Member

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    I have legbars. They lay a true blue egg. (well, some of them do).

    The blue can be really bright or light. Trying to capture the color on a camera is a PITA..

    The type of light makes a difference. Bright sun, low sun, cloudy sun, incandescent, LED, or neon lights it all makes a difference. Even the eggs they are setting next to makes a difference.

    Here is a photo bomb of eggs I have posted before.

    @dheltzel got it in the first sentence of above post.

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  9. Double Barrel

    Double Barrel Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you @TheKindaFarmGal and dheltzel. Funny you both mention the trouble of showing color in photos. I should have made mention of that in my first posting. I have read that numerous times when reading about egg color. I do understand that as well. I have had trouble photographing certain things trying to show correct color.
    I'm glad you mention the brown suppressing gene. I haven't heard of that before. Ill have to read up on that. I have Leghorns. It may come in handy breeding for egg color. I know they are used some for the Super Blue egg layers. I assumed it was just to help boost production.

    @duluthralphie I believe you if you say all those eggs are blue. I get the pic color argument. The first pic all three look green. Second pic has a Blue in middle. Are the other two Blue also? Just lighter?
     
  10. R2elk

    R2elk Overrun With Chickens

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    The first step in getting proper photos is to use a flash and do not use ambient lighting. Make sure that you have the proper white balance applied. Make sure that you are viewing images on a color corrected monitor. Remember that most people viewing your posted images will not be viewing them on color corrected monitors. Laptops are notorious for displaying colors improperly.

    Use srgb as the color space for posted images. Most browsers do not properly display the argb color space or any of the other enhanced color spaces.

    Today's cameras have the ability to record the true color of objects if set properly. Using the correct white balance is critical. Today's cameras if set properly may record images of colors that your eyes are deceived by.
     

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