am I in over my head - RE: mini cow

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by slackwater, Jul 26, 2010.

  1. slackwater

    slackwater Chillin' With My Peeps

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    SoMD
    So, in the interest of becoming more farmer-ish, I was looking for a mini cow (to eventually slaughter). THe idea was that I would raise it on our pastures until it was time and then figure out what to do with it [​IMG] (we have purchased beef locally, but never "alive" before).

    Anyway, found someone locally who has mini angus crosses and agreed to buy one. The bull (now steer) is approx 15-18mos (last spring baby) and probably 4-500lbs? Should be a good 800lbs by slaughter time next fall.

    WEnt to pick it up and it broke through the holding corral. So, needless to say, didn't get it that day. Now, it was the day that he was *fixed*, so I'm sure he was extra-testy. But, we put the transfer on hold until he could be wrangled again (he's not used to handling).

    However, the whole breakout thing has me nervous. I have a 1400lb horse...but she doesn't make me half as nervous as a steer less than 1/3 her size (with horns). He never ATTACKed, but I'm still feeling a bit...uneasy. I'm supposed to go get him tomorrow, and I'm terrified that he will go through our electric fencing - even though he is used to it - in his terror at being in a new place - and I won't know how to catch him. I'm sure he feels my unease as well.

    I kinda joked with the owner that I'd buy him and pay a board fee until he could be slaughtered...and wish he had seemed more interested. But, as it is...I just don't know. I thought ... well, I don't know what I thought, or what to do. I don't want to jump into this any more blindly than I already have and have someone get hurt.

    Please don't blast me for being stupid - my forte is horses [​IMG] Am I in over my head???
     
  2. Mommi3130

    Mommi3130 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Honestly if it was me and I felt that uncomfortable with it, I wouldn't do it. Moms have a good sense for these kind of things [​IMG] Good Luck on your decision!
     
  3. KellyHM

    KellyHM Overrun With Chickens

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    You really need a corral/stable/pen to keep him in for a few days instead of just letting him out into a pasture where he can get a running start before he hits the fence.
     
  4. slackwater

    slackwater Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a round pen, but it does not have shelter. So if I put him in there, he would be exposed. [​IMG]

    If I opt not to get him, though - how do I tell this guy? I'm sorry, I'm freaked out by the thought of not being able to control it???
     
  5. rodriguezpoultry

    rodriguezpoultry Langshan Lover

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    Most people don't have a shelter in their round pens. I'd put him in there for a few days and if you're really worried, put a tarp over a section of it so he can have some shade or shelter from downpours.
     
  6. Bossroo

    Bossroo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If it was me, I would tell the seller that I will pick the steer up when it grows up to be hamburger. [​IMG] ... or better yet , since you have NO experiencce in cattle raising, much less a 18 month BULL that was just castrated that will still act like a BULL ... RUN don't walk for the nearest exit. [​IMG]:
     
  7. aggieterpkatie

    aggieterpkatie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I definintely would back out if I were you. The owner should have castrated him LONG ago. And what is he mixed with to have horns?!!
     
  8. Katy

    Katy Flock Mistress

    If you really want to raise your own beef and have no experience with cattle you really should consider getting a bucket calf to raise up and butcher. It will be used to you and your place. As someone else said picking up an 18 month old bull.....he's not a calf anymore at that age.....on the day they castrated him was a recipe for disaster. You're probably lucky he got out at the pick up point and not when you got him home. If he's that wild where he's used to being, in a strange place it would have been even worse.
     
  9. ScaredOfShadows

    ScaredOfShadows Chillin' With My Peeps

    15+ month old male cow JUST castrated, unfriendly, and skittsh - going to a new place.... NOT A GOOD IDEA.

    I agree with - "Run - do not walk to the nearest exit" - tell the owner of the steer that you have changed your mind and are intimidated by buying something so large as a first time cattle owner.

    I would suggest buying a younger steer calf that was castrated at an early age - or a heifer that are atleast moderately used to humans and contact.


    NEVER do something or buy something you are uncomfortable with!
     
  10. danischi24

    danischi24 Loves naked pets

    Aug 17, 2008
    Australia
    I think you will be OK. Take a deep breathe.
    I'm a horse recently turned cow person & they aren't that bad! I would recommend getting a few cattle panels or stout timbers & making a very small enclosure in his field to be. Keep him in there for two days & then open the gate & walk away so he comes out in his own time.
    Maybe if you feel like making your life easier, put a (strong) halter on him while he is in the truck & tie him to something unbreakable in the little enclosure for a few more days so that you have a head start on having some control but that's only if you want to. It's no different to halter breaking a pasture raised 2 year old horse & I'd say easier. Horses & cows REALLY aren't that different to handle. Carry a stout stick for the first few weeks & give him a bop if he tries anything smart cause he might be like a spoiled stallion til he learns some respect & his hormone die down (or he might be just scared & you might never have any cheeky behavior out of him).
    Good luck & I applaud your decision to be more self supportive-I almost bought a calf for meat last week.
     

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