Am I the Problem?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by bubba1358, Oct 31, 2013.

  1. bubba1358

    bubba1358 Out Of The Brooder

    52
    1
    41
    May 13, 2013
    Middle TN
    Ir rather, is my management of the chicks the problem?

    Here's how i go: i have a movable coop and an electric net. Every week to two weeks, i move the entire netting and coop to a new area. The coop has a door and latch so the chickens hang out in there until i've moved it all, then inlet them out - about a 3-4 hour process. Then they range for a week or two and always have water and food in the feeder. They share this space with 3 sheep.

    There are 15 hens, all 26 weeks old.

    I have not yet had a single egg.

    Could the stress of moving be causing the lack of production? Also, in thinking ahead, i am contemating a 16x32 foot cage of hog panels to be moved once a week to fresh grass immediately adjacent (sharing one side). That would be chicks only. If the chicks get let into the fresh grass adjacent to their exisitng paddock once a week, then the coop wheeled in, would that be less stressful than what i do now?

    Thanks. I'm frustrated.
     
  2. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

    33,787
    6,907
    576
    Nov 27, 2012
    SW Michigan
    My Coop
    What breed of chickens?...some start laying at a later age.
    Could also be the shortening of the days...they need 12-14 hours of light..so maybe add a light on a timer to come one early in the morning.
     
  3. bubba1358

    bubba1358 Out Of The Brooder

    52
    1
    41
    May 13, 2013
    Middle TN
    Australorps, Black Giants, Red Stars, and a RI Red. I know the giants take time, but not a single egg from any of the others? I've scoured their area in case they were hiding them, and came up emmpty every time.

    We're still getting 12.5 hours of daylight.
     
  4. bubba1358

    bubba1358 Out Of The Brooder

    52
    1
    41
    May 13, 2013
    Middle TN
    Bump
     
  5. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

    9,923
    2,896
    421
    Dec 11, 2009
    Colorado Rockies
    Regardless of how much natural light they're getting, I've found that a little bit of supplemental light will jolt the onset of laying.

    It's simple and you have nothing to lose by trying it. If it's going to work, you should see the first egg sometime between one and two weeks.

    If your pasture area is too far from an electrical source, it doesn't take much wattage to accomplish this. 50 watts is enough, and you can get that from most solar devices.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by