Ameraucana thread for posting pictures and discussing our birds

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by hcammack, Oct 24, 2009.

  1. Muggsmagee

    Muggsmagee Menagerie Mama

    4,493
    17
    236
    Dec 15, 2009
    Central NY
    Quote:You don't have to play devil's advocate to ask questions! [​IMG] Keep them coming if you have them.

    The pea comb and blue egg gene go hand in hand. Therefore it is most unlikely that a pure Ameraucana will lay a brown egg. [​IMG] The color of the egg is important, because it is a trademark of the breed.

    Muggs, there are breeds that have pea comb that lay brown eggs. If your bird lays a brown or green egg while the judge is judging they can be DQd.

    Yes...you are absolutely right! Brahmas are a good example of that.

    Pea combs and blue egg gene in Ameraucanas and EE's go hand in hand.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2011
  2. SteveH

    SteveH Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 10, 2009
    West/Central IL
    Quote:There was some discussion on his topline. According to the SOP, they should have a moderate length back slightly elevated at the shoulders. Here's a couple of poor pictures of a pretty good Blue cockeral I used to have. [Bred by Paul Smith, and purchased by me before the judgeing took place at the show where I snapped this pic. He took BOV and RB behind a larger Black.]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Muggsmagee

    Muggsmagee Menagerie Mama

    4,493
    17
    236
    Dec 15, 2009
    Central NY
    Quote:There was some discussion on his topline. According to the SOP, they should have a moderate length back slightly elevated at the shoulders. Here's a couple of poor pictures of a pretty good Blue cockeral I used to have. [Bred by Paul Smith, and purchased by me before the judgeing took place at the show where I snapped this pic. He took BOV and RB behind a larger Black.]

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/uploads/44349_chickens_071.jpg

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/uploads/44349_chickens_070.jpg

    He's a looker. It would be nice to see him in better lighting. Thank you for sharing this.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2011
  4. SteveH

    SteveH Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 10, 2009
    West/Central IL
    Quote:Do you notice how different the browns are in common everyday brown egg layers? There are a variety of browns in New Hampshires, Orpingtons, Brahmas, Langshans, Wyandotte, etc, etc. And notice how rich some colors can be depending on the hen's laying cycle? Jean posted a very impressive Ameraucana egg a few months back where she said the egg got an extra dose of coloring because it remained longer in the ovaduct...on my computer it registered something near turquoise. I would hate to see the richness of these impressive eggs be dq's because it is said that the Silver Ameraucanas are supposed to lay the best representation of the Ameraucana color...and I'll tell ya...it's a very light, boring blue. [​IMG] Our Ameraucana girls lay different blues depending on where they are in their laying cycle also. My lavs have gone from a greenish hue in March to a shade near turquoise this summer, and the blacks have gone from a light sky blue to a Maxfield Parish Blue (google it), and some of my Wheatens have laid beautiful light blue eggs but now are almost close to white (weird).

    I think the chart is good for at least comparing and noting what color your girls are laying and when, because it will in fact change! Your March egg colors may be different than June...keeping track is very interesting and could be helpful if breeding certain birds! For myself, I "prefer" the richest, deepest blue I can get my hands on...they are by far the prettiest!

    I feel making one color (or a value of just a few colors) the standard will be difficult to put into affect...one reason being that people see blues differently [​IMG] .

    Also, I see a sparse beard and muffs in your EE (partial Ameraucana)...but as with all EE's, unless you know for certain the lineage of BOTH parents, it would be difficult to tell the source of just one.

    I understand that eggs are different shades at different times. The article from Bev Davis' site said that the flock of birds had to demonstrate that they COULD lay a #4 color egg. Of course at different times of the year egg color can be lighter, darker, etc.

    I did see Jean's turquoise egg... beautiful.

    I am just curious, I am sure this has been discussed in great detail by the ameraucana breeders club. What is the standard regarding egg color? Is there none?
    If a bird with two pure ameraucana parents does not come close enough to the SOP it is called an EE. If the birds legs are a shade too green, it is an EE. What if an ameraucana fit the SOP perfectly but could not lay anything but a white egg? Would it still be an ameraucana? Or an EE?
    Just asking... I hadn't thought about it until I read about the egg color standard for marans. And egg color is one of the things that makes marans unique. It is the same with ameraucana... the egg color (among other things) makes them unique.

    This is JMO. Ameraucanas lay blue eggs, it's one of the breeds characteristics, but a crucial one that usually can't be determined at a show; regardless of the birds other attributes, they aren't an Ameraucana in my yard if they dont carry the gene for blue eggs.

    I don't even consider something that lays brown or white eggs an EE, though some do if they came from a blue/green egg.
     
  5. BarnGoddess01

    BarnGoddess01 I [IMG]emojione/assets/png/2665.png?v=2.2.7[/IMG]

    Quote:There was some discussion on his topline. According to the SOP, they should have a moderate length back slightly elevated at the shoulders. Here's a couple of poor pictures of a pretty good Blue cockeral I used to have. [Bred by Paul Smith, and purchased by me before the judgeing took place at the show where I snapped this pic. He took BOV and RB behind a larger Black.]

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/uploads/44349_chickens_071.jpg

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/uploads/44349_chickens_070.jpg

    Thank you for the comments and the pictures. I do see what you are talking about now. I went out and studied my boy to see if he is really as upright as he appears in the pictures I posted. He is. So it will be interesting to see if he levels out/improves with age.
     
  6. Christie Rhae

    Christie Rhae Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,459
    31
    168
    Jul 5, 2010
    Big Island, Hawaii
    After nearly 3 months of incubating and hatching eggs I have these li'l taters...
    Today was their first supervised play date together. lol The wheaten now stays outside all day and night with her heat lamp for warmth at night. This is the little one's first time out. They will go back in the brooder in the evening.

    Baltadina, wheaten pullet 5+weeks old.
    Igor, blue marans 3 weeks old. (has a little eye issue...thus "Igor")
    Max, Ruby and Sparkle, b/b/s ameraucana 2 1/2 weeks old.
    Sparkle is the one who is slightly grayer than black and stands up really tall all the time. Far right in pic below. I wonder if it will turn out to be a Spike instead of Sparkle? lol
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  7. CluckingAround

    CluckingAround Out Of The Brooder

    10
    0
    22
    Sep 5, 2010
    Hey all! I have a question about your Ameraucanas. I have one about 7 months old and she has not layed yet. Is this normal? She is very skiddish and is nothing like our other 3 birds. The other 3, a barred rock, a buff brahma, and a white leghorn are all very sweet and greet us at our gate. She runs away and typically tries to hide. We have not treated her any differently than the others. We have had an Ameraucana before and she was nothing like this one. What can we do to make her more friendly? We are also somewhat worried about her development. Her cone has not really come in yet, although you can see the start of it. Any suggestions or comments?
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2011
  8. Araylee

    Araylee Out Of The Brooder

    47
    2
    34
    Mar 13, 2010
    I was lucky enough to purchase 10 lovely Ameraucana chicks from Jean three weeks ago. (9 lavender, 1 black.) They're four weeks old now. I know it's early to be trying to determine gender, but two of the lavender's have almost two inch long tails...the rest have NUBBINS. The closest to their tails is the black who has three individual pin things sticking out about 1/4' back there. ...So do I have two pullets, two cockerels, or just two chicks that got their tails extra fast?? One of these two boogers likes to roost on the food and water dishes that are a foot off the ground.
    Jean? Any hints? [​IMG] I just can't wait to see what I got!...And then of course, I won't be able to wait for eggs...and then chicks...[​IMG]

    Christie Rhae..It's not like I would know, but your chick looks like a little cockerel to me![​IMG]
     
  9. Christie Rhae

    Christie Rhae Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,459
    31
    168
    Jul 5, 2010
    Big Island, Hawaii
    Quote:lol.. well it's not like I would know either... but I have read that cockerel's tails grow in slower than pullets. [​IMG]
     
  10. Ivywoods

    Ivywoods Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 28, 2010
    Hiawatha, KS
    Quote:I think personalities vary a lot, even within the varieties. I have 3 wheaten roosters that follow me around like puppy dogs, but my wheaten hens are much more stand-offish. My silver roosters are skittish, but at least one of my silver hens runs to me and jumps up on my lap or my shoulder when I give them treats. All of my blacks don't seem flighty or anything, but they tend to stay back more than the others. I would say let her get just a little hungry and then work on getting her to come close for treats while you sit there quietly. Also, if the other birds are dominant or pick on her she won't want to be close to you as long as they are hogging the attention.

    Just some thoughts. Good luck with her!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by