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ameraucauna cross hen.......what do you think the cross is?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by Colorado Chick, Jul 10, 2016.

  1. Colorado Chick

    Colorado Chick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    this hen was given to me as an ameraucauna cross. But i was so busy that day, that i forgot to ask crossed with what? so curiosity is killing me, and i was wondering if you pros could take a guess. it would be fun to see. Oddly enough, except for some minor differences, she looks exactly like my other full blood ameraucauna! thanks for your help!

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  2. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop

    I doubt it was a true Ameraucana cross; which means it's probably an Easter Egger cross. That's basically a mutt crossed with another bird of questionable origin, possibly also a mutt. Honestly I'd say it's impossible to tell without knowing the ancestry.
     
  3. Colorado Chick

    Colorado Chick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I havent evee researched easter eggers. I assume they looke alot ameraucaunas? Or am i wrong in thinking that the other bird in the first pic is an ameraucauna?
     
  4. Colorado Chick

    Colorado Chick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Anyway, thanks for letting me know what you think. I figured it might be impossible, but thought tjat someone out there could pick up a trait that is distinct for other breeds :)
     
  5. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop


    It's an Easter Egger. Don't feel bad; most EEs are missold as pure Ameraucanas. EEs are part Ameraucana though; the typical EE is a multigenerational Ameraucana hybrid. EEs are mutts but they do have a lot of Ameraucana ancestry (usually plenty over 50%). They can be any color and typically (though not always) will have slate or willow legs, beard and ear muffs, and a pea comb, as well as usually laying a blue or green egg. Ameraucanas, on the other hand, will always be a certain color variety (e.g. Blue, Wheaten, or Splash), will always have slate legs, always show a beard and ear muffs, and always lay a blue (never green) egg. They are also much rarer and more expensive than EEs.
     
  6. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Out to pasture
    agree with Queen Misha
     
  7. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Actually, not true. Most hatchery Easter Eggers do not have any 'true' Ameraucana blood in their ancestry at all. It's the other way around. Easter Eggers were the origins of both the Araucana and Ameraucana breeds.
     
  8. Colorado Chick

    Colorado Chick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well this gives me more to read up on! Thank you all for the clarification. What a happy suprise that for sure one will lay a colored egg, and then the original bird I posted about may as well. By the way, I'm still trying to think of a good name for my cross breed. She is a very nervous little girl, my husband thinks I should name her chicken:)
     
  9. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop


    Do you have a source for this? As far as I know Araucanas are direct descendants from several South American landraces, unrelated to anything that could be called a modern EE. I know Ameraucanas technically were the result of crosses of Araucana out to several other breeds but I don't know that I'd call those Easter Eggers in the same sense as I'd call a bird an EE today.
     
  10. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    From the Ameraucana Alliance history

    -"But one should first understand that the “Araucana” as we know it, was never a “pure” breed, even in Chile."

    They originated from two different 'landrace' types. And those were subsequently heavily crossbred with European and Mediterranean breeds. It is those birds that were imported into the U.S. They were, in fact, what would be considered today, Easter Eggers.

    -"The earliest imports were mostly of selected rumpless and tufted varieties. Later imports were made up of “Araucanas” of all types, among which were bearded muffed tailed varieties, all of which then were bred here in the USA. All of these were at that time labeled “Araucanas”."

    -"However, there were a number of dedicated breeders who attempted to keep what they each viewed as the “original Araucana” from becoming extinct, and various groups formed, but each had their own idea of what a “Standard Araucana” should be.
    Among them were bearded muffed tailed types, but these were far from being standardized."

    You have to remember, all of them were called Araucana, early on. There was no Araucana, Ameraucana, Easter Egger distinctions made. That changed once the standard for what we now call Araucana was accepted. Once the Araucana was defined by the APA, all other birds that didn't meet that standard were termed Easter Eggers.
    Both 'breeds', as we know them today, were bred from Easter Egger type birds.
     

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