An overly-aggressive drake?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by agregg15, Jul 26, 2011.

  1. agregg15

    agregg15 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 8, 2011
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    Hi guys! I just have a quick question. I saw my "top of the pecking order" drake (Ivan) mate with one of the females this morning. I changed my duck's water about an hour ago and saw that when they were in the pool, the girls would nibble on Ivan, then he would grab their bills, and then grab their necks and start to pull. I read on a website that this is a mating behavior, but I'm not sure. I'm scared for the girls because he is really rough. He also will run over and attack my hand when I'm changing their food or petting one of the of the girls (I can see why he does that.....) Is he too aggressive for my flock?
     
  2. agregg15

    agregg15 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Anyone?
     
  3. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners Premium Member

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    Ivan needs to be watched, but whether he is too aggressive is uncertain.

    Is he the only drake? If not, how is he with other drakes? What is the drake:duck ratio in your flock?

    If he's being aggressive with you, then you may want to seriously consider the "I'm the boss" treatment for him. I hope others will give their stories here, as I have only read about this (no drakes at this point in my flock).

    The idea is to firmly but calmly demonstrate to Ivan that you are bigger than he is. Some do this by picking up their drakes and cradling them (watch not to let feet or bill too close to your bare flesh or face) upside down for a while.

    Smaller people (with larger drakes) have turned drakes on their backs on the ground and held them there for a while. The idea is not to hurt the drake, just to pin him and make him understand the true pecking order.

    It may take a few lessons to convince him.

    Drakes can indeed kill ducks, either by aggressive breeding, or drowning. So the risk exists. But whether Ivan is truly a menace to your ducks I cannot say at this point. As I wrote at first, watch him - carefully. If in doubt, separate him while you're not around.
     
  4. agregg15

    agregg15 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:My duck:drake ratio is 2:2 because we got them from TSC and weren't able to pick which sex we wanted [​IMG]. I'm going to get more ducks for my flock soon (2-3 Welsh Harlequins and maybe 1 golden 300 from Metzer.) My other drake (Plop) is sweet, doesn't hurt the girls, and was the smallest out of the drakes. I'm definitely going to try those "I'm the boss treatments" on Ivan. I usually just gently hold his bill in place when he tries to attack my hand or pick him up and hold him for a couple minutes. I have noticed that Ivan has been aggressive since he was a duckling and I'm thinking that he is just too aggressive. Thanks for the help [​IMG]
     
  5. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners Premium Member

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    Last edited: Jul 26, 2011
  6. agregg15

    agregg15 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks again [​IMG]
     
  7. iamcuriositycat

    iamcuriositycat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    He would probably behave less aggressively if he weren't "competing" with another male, however mild-mannered that male may be. But take-down methods are a great way to get a handle on aggression, especially aggression toward humans. One simple and effective method for bringing him down a notch is simply to separate him for a week or two from the rest of the flock. They will work out a new pecking order and when he comes back he'll have lost some confidence and standing, and as a result is likely to be a lot less aggressive.

    Adding more females to the flock really is going to be necessary, though, so I'm glad you're doing that. With only one female per male, you're going to have competition and they may hurt the girls and each other, even if one of them never really fights. The dominant drake will always be more aggressive when he feels he has something to "prove" to a limited number of females. Men, I tell ya. [​IMG]
     
  8. agregg15

    agregg15 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Hahahahaha, that's the truth and that sounds like a great idea [​IMG] I just hate how TSC randomly picks ducklings and chicks instead of having them sexed [​IMG] (it's Metzer and private sellers from now on.) I definitely will separate him for a while. I never really thought of separating him from the rest of the flock as a way to take him down a notch. Thanks a bunch [​IMG]
     
  9. newbyduckmom

    newbyduckmom Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 18, 2011
    Snohomish County, WA
    I was just sitting here reading this feed and heard a commotion from our duck house. Go out and find the three drakes have my one hen pinned flat on the ground. First time 2 of the three of them has shown any interest whatsoever!

    Drakes are now separate. Hen is okay. Scared the human. Thought she was dead - the hen that is.

    I had started separating them. Then we got a couple more ducks that are several months younger and everyone seemed to be getting along. Any only one of the drakes had shown any interest. Until just now. Glad I was home when it happened or would have one less duck. Amazing - and pretty scary~ :0(
     
  10. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Quote:In water this is a senario which frequently results in drowned hens. Well done on your part to separate them before damage was done to the hen.
     

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