Anchoring the coop down

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Dons916, Oct 27, 2009.

  1. Dons916

    Dons916 New Egg

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    I'm building a coop and need some advice on anchoring it down.It is 4x8. I poured 4 1'sg footing and the wind flew it over.Pulled the footing out of the ground.It is a shed type roof and 2x4 framind with 3/8 ply. siding.
    I'm thinking while it's on it's back is to cut a foot and a half off the bottom. That would make it 6 1/2 in front and 4 1/2 in back. Maybe not being so hi might help.
    We don't have these strong winds very often,But it has to withstand them if it happens. I really want to keep the dirt floor.
    Maybe a full lingth fondation on the sides. Don't know HELP
    Don in Sacramento Calif.
     
  2. ColoradoMike

    ColoradoMike Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I don't quite understand what this means.

    Got pics?
     
  3. lilchick

    lilchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you put it on heavy runners like the 4x6 treated ones it should hold it down. Then fill it in with a bit of sand or pea gravel level with the runners. I too prefer a dirt floor in mine. That way you wouldn't lose the height in the coop which will be easier on you when you enter it! good luck......
     
  4. wildorchid053

    wildorchid053 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 12, 2009
    syracuse area, ny
    we live on a hill top .. set the 4x4s 3ft deep in concrete.. the only thing that will take it out is a twister lol
     
  5. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Quote:Sorry, not sure what you mean?

    I'm thinking while it's on it's back is to cut a foot and a half off the bottom. That would make it 6 1/2 in front and 4 1/2 in back. Maybe not being so hi might help.

    That would definitely help.

    Also if possible (and if it isn't already) make sure it's turned with it's "back" to the wind, that is the low side of the roof on the upwind side.

    Then I'd make or buy some good-sized earth anchors, put them in several feet deep at least, one on each corner of the building, and you should be good unless your soil is like pure unconsolidated sand or something like that.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat​
     
  6. Dons916

    Dons916 New Egg

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    Oct 7, 2009
    Quote:I don't quite understand what this means.

    Got pics?

    Drop the camera and in prosses of replacing it

    Try this. On each cornner I dug a hole 1 foot deep and 1 foot square.Then I filled it with cement and put a foundation bole in it. Then the coop sits on it so I can bolt it down.
    The wind pulled the footings out of the ground.They are still bolted to the bottom of the coop.
    After giving it some though I think I will dig down to the hardpan (16") and a foot sq.
    Like I said these winds at not the norm,But it might happen again 35mph and gust to 40.
    Thanks for your help. Don
     
  7. The Sheriff

    The Sheriff Overrun With Chickens

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    That was some wind today Don. My coop is under oak trees so the wind always concerns me. Good luck digging through the hardpan. If I had to do that in Citrus Heights, I'd have to dig halfway to China! Hope you get it secured. Wind is supposed to let up tonight.

    Mary in CH
     
  8. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    On each cornner I dug a hole 1 foot deep and 1 foot square.Then I filled it with cement and put a foundation bole in it. Then the coop sits on it so I can bolt it down

    You had the right idea, and just didnt go deep enough.

    Make then twice as deep, and wider at the bottom than at the top

    You may want to add a couple more footings on the sides also​
     
  9. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Quote:You had the right idea, and just didnt go deep enough.

    Make then twice as deep, and wider at the bottom than at the top

    Wider at the bottom than at the top is IMPORTANT, too, if youre doing it this way.

    I still think you'd be better off auguring an earth anchor into the ground at each corner, though, unless your hardpan is really world-class impenetrable.

    If you are stuck with only being able to dig down 12-16" and truly no force available to you will go deeper, then I am skeptical that you will be able to anchor the building against strong winds by the foundation, and would suggest a completely different tactic: On the downwind side, which again really ought to be the *high* side, put in two 4x4s or larger, at about a 45 degree angle, from the top corners of the coop to the ground. Just beyond them (touching), dig a 1x1x2 trench, the 2' dimension being parallel to the coop, and fill it with concrete to keep the braces from being pushed back. Then use galvanized metal connecting hardware (hurricane tie type, it will be with the joist hangers in the hardware store) to firmly attach the tops of those angled brace posts to the top corners of your coop. Your coop is now unlikely to go anywhere [​IMG]

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  10. LuggNutt

    LuggNutt Out Of The Brooder

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    I saw a friends coop (4' X 12' wire sides) after having been flipped several times during Hurricane Charlie. The plastic roofing was enough to catch the air. It took four of us plus a truck to get it flipped back over.

    I intend to use mobile home anchors to secure my coop to the ground, overkill for the size of my coop (12' X 7') but I don't want it moving.
     

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