Anne Rice has a new book coming out!!!

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by AquaEyes, Nov 25, 2011.

  1. NYboy

    NYboy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am a big fan, can't wait!!!
     
  2. tdgill

    tdgill Chillin' With My Peeps

    i like anne...

    the vampire lestat was awesome
     
  3. Q9

    Q9 General Headache

    Saw a thread posted by Aquaeyes, clicked without even looking at the title. [​IMG] Who's Anne Rice? I've heard the name before, but I have no idea who she is. I guess this is an urban fantasy type book?
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2011
  4. michickenwrangler

    michickenwrangler To Finish Is To Win

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    She wrote Interview With the Vampire, The Vampire Lestat, QUeen of the darn, Tale of the Body Thief, Memnoch the Devil, Violin, The Vampire Armand and many, many others. Oh, the "witch" books too although I can't recall all the titles of those.

    I read Interview through Memnoch. They were OK, not my favorites though. I tried reading her sister Alice Borchardt's werewolf stories but couldn't get past some horrible anachronisms and cheesy dialogue.
     
  5. AquaEyes

    AquaEyes Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:The Witching Hour, Lasher and Taltos.

    Anne Rice is all about writing richly detailed stories set within historical times, such that while you're reading them, you can't help but half-think things like "I wonder how many vampires are in my home town."

    She also wrote some non-series books, like Feast of All Saints, Cry to Heaven, The Mummy,, etc.

    I first started reading Interview with the Vampire when I was in high school, over one summer. I got hooked, and went through every book of her vampire series, and anxiously awaited each new one as it came out. The first book was written the year I was born (1976), which I thought was cute -- I was born to read her stuff (hahaha). When the book Merrick was announced to come out soon, I took up the Witch series and read Feast of All Saints -- because Merrick was the first of three books that started to merge characters and story lines from them with the Vampire characters. When I started getting impatient between releases of new books, I went back and read her other stuff. Then she announced she wasn't going to write anymore Vampire books, and started the Jesus series. This Werewolf book will be her first return back to the sort of "spooky" characters in many years.

    She's also just a fascinating person. I haven't met her, but I know that she is very open to meeting her fans, and used to do tours of her home in New Orleans.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2011
  6. Q9

    Q9 General Headache

    Quote:The Witching Hour, Lasher and Taltos.

    Anne Rice is all about writing richly detailed stories set within historical times, such that while you're reading them, you can't help but half-think things like "I wonder how many vampires are in my home town."

    She also wrote some non-series books, like Feast of All Saints, Cry to Heaven, The Mummy,, etc.

    I first started reading Interview with the Vampire when I was in high school, over one summer. I got hooked, and went through every book of her vampire series, and anxiously awaited each new one as it came out. The first book was written the year I was born (1976), which I thought was cute -- I was born to read her stuff (hahaha). When the book Merrick was announced to come out soon, I took up the Witch series and read Feast of All Saints -- because Merrick was the first of three books that started to merge characters and story lines from them with the Vampire characters. When I started getting impatient between releases of new books, I went back and read her other stuff. Then she announced she wasn't going to write anymore Vampire books, and started the Jesus series. This Werewolf book will be her first return back to the sort of "spooky" characters in many years.

    She's also just a fascinating person. I haven't met her, but I know that she is very open to meeting her fans, and used to do tours of her home in New Orleans.

    That actually sounds kinda interesting. I'm usually not one for urban fantasy and that kind of thing, but I may have to look into these. My only urban fantasy books as of right now are the first two books of the Monster Hunter International series, which leaves me asking, "If a werewolf attacked me, would I go for the 12-gauge or the .40 cal?" [​IMG] Very action-packed ones, and they don't go for the whole sympathetic monsters deal, which I find kinda refreshing. See the monster, shoot the monster. But Anne Rice is as good as all these folks say she is, I'm gonna have to check out those books.
     
  7. AquaEyes

    AquaEyes Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:The Witching Hour, Lasher and Taltos.

    Anne Rice is all about writing richly detailed stories set within historical times, such that while you're reading them, you can't help but half-think things like "I wonder how many vampires are in my home town."

    She also wrote some non-series books, like Feast of All Saints, Cry to Heaven, The Mummy,, etc.

    I first started reading Interview with the Vampire when I was in high school, over one summer. I got hooked, and went through every book of her vampire series, and anxiously awaited each new one as it came out. The first book was written the year I was born (1976), which I thought was cute -- I was born to read her stuff (hahaha). When the book Merrick was announced to come out soon, I took up the Witch series and read Feast of All Saints -- because Merrick was the first of three books that started to merge characters and story lines from them with the Vampire characters. When I started getting impatient between releases of new books, I went back and read her other stuff. Then she announced she wasn't going to write anymore Vampire books, and started the Jesus series. This Werewolf book will be her first return back to the sort of "spooky" characters in many years.

    She's also just a fascinating person. I haven't met her, but I know that she is very open to meeting her fans, and used to do tours of her home in New Orleans.

    That actually sounds kinda interesting. I'm usually not one for urban fantasy and that kind of thing, but I may have to look into these. My only urban fantasy books as of right now are the first two books of the Monster Hunter International series, which leaves me asking, "If a werewolf attacked me, would I go for the 12-gauge or the .40 cal?" [​IMG] Very action-packed ones, and they don't go for the whole sympathetic monsters deal, which I find kinda refreshing. See the monster, shoot the monster. But Anne Rice is as good as all these folks say she is, I'm gonna have to check out those books.

    The books are not about "scary vampires presented as monsters." The books are written from the perspective of the vampires themselves -- hence the first book, called Interview with the Vampire. I won't be spoiling anything by setting it up, so here goes.

    A young struggling newspaper reporter snags an interview with a man claiming to be a couple hundred years old -- and a vampire. His name is Louis, and he wants to sort of "come out" to a mortal -- something that is against the most strict taboo among vampires. Louis tells the reporter about living as a mortal in New Orleans during the 1700's, about how he was "chosen" by his maker, what the process of changing felt like, how he went about his nights, how he hunted and fed, where he traveled, etc.

    The second book, The Vampire Lestat, is narrated by Louis' maker, who decides that if Louis can "come out" and tell his story (in the "world" where this takes place, the first book is actually published, and Lestat and all the other vampires read it and are furious) by writing his own book. You'll come to learn that Lestat is a bit of a "brat" who likes to do things that are "anti-establishment" in the vampire world. Most of the later books are also narrated by Lestat, but there are others who come in and share their stories. Since they are hundreds of years old, and come from different parts of the world, you will read about what it was like to live as a country-lord in Europe during Columbus' time, growing up as a slave-boy in ancient Rome, meeting a vampire imprisoned by pre-Christian Nordic people, finding out about the first two vampires who were royals in ancient Egypt, etc. The books are very sensual, exciting, historically detailed -- very easy to "feel" as though an ancient vampire really IS telling this story. And that's what made reading the books fun for me.

    The Witch series begins with The Witching Hour. The chapters go back and forth in time and place, then everything gets brought together early in the middle, the drama unfolds, and you're left with a bit of a cliff-hanger -- after almost 1,000 pages. Basically, this affluent New Orleans family has had one "chosen" member haunted by a spirit for 13 generations, and this spirit maintains a sort of parasitic-love relationship with the chosen member. You find out the history of the association, learn about key "chosen" members through the generations, how the spirit built the wealth of the family, why the spirit continues to haunt the family through the ages, what it wants, etc.

    The two books that follow -- Lasher, and Taltos -- answer some questions raised in the first, give a history into the origins of the spirit, as well as giving an ending to the cliff-hanger from the first book.

    Most of the other books do not progress into a series. If you go to www.annerice.com you can see the books she's written and a little background on them.
     
  8. NYboy

    NYboy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    White plains
    She has also written adult fiction under another name. Forgot the name it,s been a long time since reading them. wow can she be dark!!
     
  9. The Chicken Lady

    The Chicken Lady Moderator Staff Member

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    Anne Rice is the reason why I will never read Twilight. She spoiled me for any other kind of vampire book. Her stories are really not for the tween set, but as an adult reader, I'm not worried about that. Her writing is fabulous!
     

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