Another electric fence question....

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by laxrick, Dec 8, 2008.

  1. laxrick

    laxrick Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 30, 2008
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    Sorry to bug... but as long as I'm fixing things I might as well make sure this is right...

    How far should posts be placed apart? I'm getting conflicting information.

    I have spaced them 15' apart, and they are the very thin composite rods from Tractor Supply you buy in packs of 20.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    What kind of wire?
     
  3. laxrick

    laxrick Out Of The Brooder

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    The cheap stuff at Tractor Supply, don't have the spool with me at work, but it was like $13 a 1/4 mi., and I'd estimate (and I'm not good at that) about 12-14 gauge. Aluminum... I think.
     
  4. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    So we're talking high-tensile and not woven-wire then?

    If high tensile, 30' spacing is fine. The fence is not a physical barrier so any animal running full speed will be able to get through it. It's the zap which keeps them in, not the wire itself.

    For woven-wire style fences which are forming a physical barrier, 10' spacing is more common.
     
  5. Fudgie

    Fudgie Hatching Queen - Got Fudge?

    Quote:Is it the stuff I showed you on the other thread? Probably a 17 guage or a 12.5 aluminum guage...if it was hi tensile, he could e-mail us without a computer! [​IMG]

    Here is what that link said about fence spacing

    Since an electric fence isn't a physical barrier, the wire doesn't have to be stretched (Piano String) tight. But, pull it taut enough to stay at the same height between posts. Posts should be spaced every 25 ft. to 75 ft., depending on the terrain. If you space your post 75 ft. apart you should use fiberglass battens to keep your wire spacing the same height between the post.

    Don't try to evenly space posts; in level terrain posts can be spaced farther apart. In uneven terrain, posts need to be spaced wherever there is a high or low place. On hillsides, posts should be installed perpendicular to the slope. This keeps the wire at the proper height and prevents it from binding on insulators or clips.

    here is that link again, very good info in that link!
    http://www.afence.com/Electric_Fence/how_to_elecfence/elecinstall.htm
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 8, 2008
  6. Fudgie

    Fudgie Hatching Queen - Got Fudge?

    Did you get the fence going laxrick?
     
  7. laxrick

    laxrick Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 30, 2008
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    Fence is up and running!

    The shoes were definitely grounding me out. When I took one off... ZAAAAP!

    However, I noticed my cat passing underneath a wire and he seemed unaffected. Is it possible he didn't touch the wire... just his hair, thus no shock?

    Also, my dog touched the wire and was unaffected. However, he was on his leash so I don't know if he was grounded by me.

    I'm nervous to try this on goats because if it doesn't shock them, they're gone because they are new and kind of skittish of humans.
     
  8. Fudgie

    Fudgie Hatching Queen - Got Fudge?

    I would run the hot wire around the inside of the pen the goats are in right now. Just like you have it outside, let them get "used" to it in there first. Then if they get shocked, they cannot go anywhere except away from it. They will learn to respect the wire. We had to do this with a mean bull and it WORKED!!! Also don't forget to tie orange ties or some coloring so they can actually SEE the wire and where it is. That will prevent unwanted accidents. Dad used an old sheet and tied small 1" wide pieces around the wire for sight purposes.

    Yes the dog could be grounded by your shoes. Haven't you ever seen kids standing hand in hand trying to get some FOOL to hang on the last hand. then the first person grabs the wire and the last guy gets it! Ok we were sick kids when we were little...

    Believe me they will know. Also if it is a non continuous shock like a bleep bleep bleep bleep pattern the cat could have gotten lucky! and hit it during the bleep. I have seen cattle hit it and nothing then BWAAALLLLL and down to their knees.
     

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