Another goat fencing question

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Jensownzoo, Apr 6, 2016.

  1. Jensownzoo

    Jensownzoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So. I got two Nigerian yearling wethers the day before yesterday and they are a challenge for sure. They can hurl themselves over the four foot chain link fence that surrounds their temporary enclosure, which I was not counting on, so I spent a great deal of time chasing goats yesterday and not getting much else done. :/ I got the goats to clear brush in some of the wooded areas of my property.

    So, basically I wanted to use some temporary fencing for the goats, let them clear the brush for me, move the goats and their fencing to another area, and work on installing a permanent fence in the now-cleared area so I could let the chicken range or let my dogs run or whatever.

    After yesterday, I was thinking I would have to go electric to have any hope of goat containment...and they really do need to stay put as there is a busy road, potentially unfriendly dogs, etc.. Would something like this Electrostop Plus netting https://www.premier1supplies.com/detail.php?prod_id=87698 have a chance of working or should I rethink my whole strategy of having goats?
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Let It Snow Premium Member

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    When you first get goats they are terrified and confused and often can, and will, climb and jump their way out of everything. Once they are settled and more calm they can be easier to keep in. Electric fencing can work really well as long as it is working well, goats can tell when a fence is grounding out. A good three stand can work well depending on the size of your goats. If they are hornless than I've read of people putting cattle panels together and moving those around.

    My goats could get out if they really want to, but because they are happy they don't, but there's always the risk. That's life with goats.
     
  3. Jensownzoo

    Jensownzoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yeah, I don't blame them for the behavior...they're just being goats. Not only that, but they were just taken from their family. Today they only got out twice, so I was able to get the holes dug for the fence to protect the garden. You know those movies where people start piling furniture and everything they can lay hands on in front of the door to keep the monster/bad guy out? My chainlink fence looks a bit like that right now, but to keep goats in! After they figured out they couldn't escape anymore, they found all the amusements that I had put in their pen for them and seemed pretty content.

    They don't have horns, so the cattle panels would work. I thought about it today and realized that they need a pretty big run-up to clear the fences. Was wondering if making the temporary fencing long and narrow like an aisle would be a working solution. Then they would have room to run, but I would only really have to worry about the ends. Or would goats be able to hook their legs through the openings in the cattle panel to do vertical climbs? I know there are dogs that do that.
     
  4. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Let It Snow Premium Member

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    What breeds or mixes are they and how old? I had a goat that used to straight jump over a four foot gate without any running start, he would eat the chicken feed than hop back. I finally seen him doing it and we added more boards to make it seven feet so he couldn't do it. Every goat I have is different as far as what they will do or try. You will have to figure yours out as far as what they will do. Goats are a challenge with fences. You could try some 4-5 foot woven wire with a hot wire about half way up, after the initial shock they shouldn't get near it, but it would be hard to move. I haven't had any goats that could climb a fence. Wish I could remember who used the cattle panels, they could help you maybe.
     
  5. Jensownzoo

    Jensownzoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Two Nigerian yearlings

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  6. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Let It Snow Premium Member

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    They are adorable, and harder to keep in than dairy breeds because they are good at jumping. They do grow out of it as they mature, but might always look for an opportunity. I think you just need some time for them to know you and your place and they won't be trying to get out all the time. I still would recommend having at least one strand of electric eventually so they respect your fencing, it doesn't have to be on all the time, but sometimes with goats you have to do it.
     
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  7. Jensownzoo

    Jensownzoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    One goat got out within 5 minutes of my arrival, so he spent the rest of the visit in an unused bathroom that's going to be gutted so I could get some work done. The second goat stayed put, so he got a pile of brush to nibble on while I worked on the garden fence. Probably would have completed it if it hadn't started to rain. But I got all the posts set and the connecting rails up, just have to put the no-dig wire apron and the pickets on tomorrow then I can work on finding a pre-made gate for it. With the garden protected from the goats, they can come and be with me while I work on turning the existing chain link fence into 6ft privacy fence (multiple reasons for doing, not just goats). That will make all of us happier, I think.

    If I add a hot wire to the privacy fence, do I need to worry about it frying the chickens if they're out on a supervised ranging session?
     
  8. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Let It Snow Premium Member

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    The chickens will get a shock and run too. Hopefully you get something that keeps them in. Goats turn you into an ingenious thinker.
     
  9. BBQJOE

    BBQJOE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Void where prohibited.
    I'm new to all this. Is goat fencing like cock fighting?
     
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  10. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Let It Snow Premium Member

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    Goat fencing is for goats that have been dehorned or were born without them, we don't want them to feel left out of the goat Olympics. Everyone deserves a chance.
     

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