Another hen being aggressive to broody hen and chicks

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by cappadocia, May 24, 2016.

  1. cappadocia

    cappadocia Just Hatched

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    Feb 10, 2014
    maypearl, tx
    I have a wyandotte who just hatched out chicks last night and some are still hatching this morning. My ameraucana decided she doesn't like these intruders and keeps trying to attack the babies while the wyandotte sits on top of them. I have shut the coop door to keep the ameraucana away from her while she gets the rest out. My rooster and other hen don't seem interested in the goings on at all. So should I pull mama and babies out of the flock and put them in their own space or keep them in and hope the ameraucana will back down? The ameraucana is generally skittish and shy and is lowest in the pecking order which is why I was so surprised that she acted like this. Any help would be appreciated!
     
  2. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    Colorado Rockies
    It really shouldn't be a surprise your low ranking hen is acting like a thug. Low ranking chickens are usually the worst bullies as are younger pullets.

    For the safety of the chicks, keep the new brood separated, at least for the first couple of weeks. It's what most chicken keepers do to avoid tragedy.
     
  3. cappadocia

    cappadocia Just Hatched

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    1
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    Feb 10, 2014
    maypearl, tx
    Next quesion is I have a rather large dog crate big enough for mama and babies to move around in that I can keep on my covered porch should I use that if I put shavings down and maybe some cardboard along the side so fuzz balls don't escape?
     
  4. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Jun 18, 2010
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    [​IMG]

    I have a different viewpoint. I say if you have separate housing, pull the aggressive bird out and leave momma and babies with the rest of the flock. Leave the other hen out for a week or so, until the babies are sturdier and mobile. Then put the hen back in on a day you're available to keep a close eye on things. Use the week to put up hiding places for your littles so they can get away from a cranky mature hen. This can be as simple as a piece of scrap plywood leaning against the side of the coop or run.

    I keep my broodies in the flock when at all possible. It makes things so much easier on everyone (me included [​IMG]).
     

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