Another hex netting thread...

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Tarac, Mar 7, 2013.

  1. Tarac

    Tarac Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 27, 2013
    Gainesville, FL
    So I know this material has been discussed ad nauseum with parties pitted on both sides but something I have not seen come up specifically and wonder about it.

    Briefly, the reasoning I see explained behind not using hex netting is 1. it is too flimsy and 2. the opening is big enough for a coon hand to reach through (or rats to access, etc.). Instead it is recommended to use 1/2" hardware cloth or welded wire of the same opening dimension.

    I am currently considering removing a portion of the roof on my run and putting something else on to allow more sunlight in. It's a 10x10 run (a converted dog kennel) with a plywood based roof at the moment. I really want to use hex netting for one simple reason- it comes in a width that is big enough to span the roof section (gabled, each half is 6'x10' so all of the pannels on the whole run are 6'x10' sections more or less) in two solid pieces. The rest of the run is chainlink outside and 1/2" hardware cloth inside.

    I found a supplier of hex netting while looking for more hardware cloth that makes the netting in a heavier gauge than "normal" hardware cloth (looking at 18 gauge but they make even heavier) which is 19 gauge typically AND it has 5/8" diameter openings. So it is both stronger and almost as tight as hardware cloth PLUS it comes in 72" width, perfect.

    I am in a relatively urban area so I don't have any major predators except coons and possums and hawks, owls, osprey, etc. No big ones like bears or coyotes. Lots of dogs, pretty much every household has at least one. I know better than to use 1" wire of any kind, learned the hard way. But does it seem reasonable to use hex netting that is both heavier gauge and similarly sized as 1/2" welded? Coons can definitely climb any structure they can get their nasty little hands around. Maybe I should just leave the roof be as is?
     
  2. debid

    debid Overrun With Chickens

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    It sounds like the material you are considering bears little resemblance to the poultry wire people warn against. It should be fine as long as it's galvanized to prevent rusting.
     
  3. Tarac

    Tarac Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 27, 2013
    Gainesville, FL
    It is the same thing though, just 2 gauges heavier and smaller opening (and bigger price of course). Manufacturing is the same so I just wanted to make sure the above reasons are the only reasons not to use it. It seems reasonable but I'm a newbie kind of. I figured fewer seams is more integrity and easier application.
     
  4. Trefoil

    Trefoil Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think it would be fine for the roof, as long as you can keep coons off of it. I use regular chicken for the roof of 1/2 my run and haven't had any problems. It does need good support though. To use it on the sides, I would want to be sure that the larger opening wouldn't expose your chickens to weasels. My hardware guy told me that it takes 1/2" to keep weasels out. But I'm not sure how much slop there is in that. Would you mind telling us where & at what price this is available?
     
  5. Tarac

    Tarac Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 27, 2013
    Gainesville, FL
    it's sold cut to length you have to call or email to get a quote and I am considering buying it from direct metals. But 5/8" is 1 of the standard manufacturing sizes for hex netting, just not 1 of the size is typically carried at Lowes or Home Depot. It is only 1 eighth inch larger then half inch hardware cloth. Luckily I don't have to worry about weasels in Florida.
     
  6. Tarac

    Tarac Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 27, 2013
    Gainesville, FL
    sorry about the wacky English my phone is "correcting" for me lol.
     

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