Another live stock guardian question

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by eggcited2, Oct 11, 2011.

  1. eggcited2

    eggcited2 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What should I see when I look at Great Pyrenees pups? I am considering one that is 6 months old.

    It actually was brought out to my house today so I could see how it would do with my chickens and other animals. It ran at the chickens at first, but not like when a dog is wanting to attack. I have seen my own dogs go after the chickens on the other side of fence, and they have a totally different look. Also one time a chicken flew into the back yard and two of my dogs went after it, and their 'attack' run looked different. The pup this morning looked more like a "i want to sniff you" kind of thing. After the person told him no, he didn't do it anymore.

    Also, how should his gate look when he walks? I thought maybe a couple times that he sort of looked a bit week in one hip/leg. It was so very fleeting, I couldn't tell if it was my imagination. A friend who was here said she never noticed anything with his walk or gate.

    He was a bit hesitant to let the goats smell him, (he seemed a little bit afraid, but he never acted aggressive). She said he was butted by a big ram yesterday and it knocked him flat, so he was a bit hesitant to let my goats come running at him to sniff.

    The $350 is a lot of money for me to spend (I know that is not a lot of money for a good guardian dog) and I do not want to put that money into a dog that is not going to be ok.

    I do know the lady does supply GP live stock guardians to people on a regular basis (she is an established GP breeder with a good reputation).

    BTW: the chicken I mentioned above, I hollered at my dogs to stop and they did, so the chicken was ok. Didn't want to leave anyone thinking the chicken had been killed by my kids.
     
  2. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    For that amount of money , he should be registered, and you should be able to see the parents at the breeders.

    I wouldn't worry about a little limp if he got butted, since he may still be sore.

    Here are some good tips on choosing and raising REAL LGD's:

    http://www.bountifulfarm.com/lgd_seminar.htm
     
  3. KandiandJerry

    KandiandJerry Chillin' With My Peeps

    I agree at that price ....he better be registered and parents should be available to see..... also make sure he has double dew claws.....do you have a picture...we have alot of experience with these.....also rule out hip dysplaysia....what kind of markings does he have badger face or solid white?
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2011
  4. eggcited2

    eggcited2 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:He is registered and both parents are on her farm to see. He has double dew claws, asked her to show me. He is not solid white; has some lighter tan on his face and a couple patches on his hind quarters, and a bit of grey or very light black across his muzzle.
     
  5. KandiandJerry

    KandiandJerry Chillin' With My Peeps

    He shouldn't have black...to learn more...look up great pyrenees standard on akc website....he will probably make you a wonderful dog.....but you don't want to pay top dollar for one that has color flaws or hip dysplasia....when I first started with Great Pyrenees I didn't know jack....but after reading article after article....you start to know the standard and what to look for...traits that you want and don't want....hope this helps and good luck with him....
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2011
  6. dainerra

    dainerra Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would ask for the OFA numbers of the parents (or their registered names) and look it up yourself on the OFA website. You should also ask about any problems in the grandparents, aunts, uncles, etc. Not just "oh my vet said that his hips are ok" or "vet says they are healthy" but the actual paperwork that the tests were actually run. Again, they should be able to give you the info on all the dogs in the family. OFA, all you need is names and can look it up yourself.

    $350 is NOT a lot of money. That's actually really cheap, in most breeds it would be a sign to run away screaming from this breeder. Purchase price is actually the smallest portion of the cost of the dog. You will spend WAY more than that on basic healthcare and food the first year! Just basic healthtesting on one parent is going to be at least that much.

    6 months old, I wouldn't be surprised at limping, even if he hadn't been butted by an animal. That is a huge growth time for pups - legs to long in the front one day, too long in the back the next. [​IMG] They are really gawky and clumsy too, so you've got to REALLY know what you are looking for. At 6 months, that is old enough to do a prelim-xray for OFA, really the only 100% sure way to know that his hips are ok. Of course, that is going to be a couple hundred $$ by itself (my area around $200, other places I've heard $300+), again that's why purchase price is the least expensive thing! Honestly, if I was looking on this dog as an investment, I would only take him on the contingency that his hips would pass. Also be sure to have the vet do a complete workup with 48 to 72 hours of bringing him home.

    Did she breed this male to this female because she happens to own both of them? It's pretty rare (in any breed) for a breeder to own 2 dogs that are the perfect compliment to each other.
     
  7. carolinagirl58

    carolinagirl58 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 30, 2011
    Lugoff, SC
    Pyrs often have what's called Badger markings. These markings on their heads are often dark gray or tan and usually fade as the dog ages. So the badger markings are not in indication of low quality. Do not expect a 6 month old pup to be safe with stock though. Even if he was raised with stock, he can not be trusted alone with them until he is MUCH older. LGDs need to be taught what is acceptable and what's not. Did this pup come from working parents or pet parents? It makes a HUGE difference, especially with a breed that has been puppy-mill bred for many years. Many of these dogs do not have the working instincts they are supposed to have just because they have been bred to be pets for so many years.
     
  8. eggcited2

    eggcited2 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Thank you for the link, it was good reading and information.
     
  9. eggcited2

    eggcited2 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:He is from working parents and has been raised only outside with them. The woman has two or three sets (male and female she breeds) that are all working and not pets. She has a dachshund for pet. lol Her working pairs are only from working dog lines. She has no confusion about what her GP are supposed to do, thankfully. [​IMG]
     
  10. eggcited2

    eggcited2 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Thanks for the information. I'll ask about OFA numbers and certification.

    She has two or three working breeding pairs (right now I can't remember if it is 2 or 3). I have been to her farm (working farm of chickens, goats, geese, ducks, rabbits, turkeys, and other small livestock I can't remember right now) and seen her dogs, living and housing for them, and all that. The dogs are out with the animals at all times, except during breeding, gestation, birth and early on in the pups life - a couple weeks till they are ok to roam with mom or dad.
     

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