Another rooster question

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by bluedragon, Jul 23, 2010.

  1. bluedragon

    bluedragon Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 17, 2008
    Central Cali
    So, first an update on my leghorn hen/rooster dilemma. The consensus is she's a he. That's fine, he's very handsome and pretty gentle. I am wondering about the management issues of having a rooster in with four hens.

    Not concerned with legal issues, I know what our city ordinances are regarding roosters. My questions are more about interactions. We originally wanted hens for eggs. Well, I remember high school biology and understand what happens when a chicken and rooster get together. So, in order to get some edible eggs, do we need to keep him in his own enclosure or can we keep them together? Any other suggestions you might have about managing co-ed accomodations would be helpful.

    Thanks,
    D
     
  2. lisa lisk

    lisa lisk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 29, 2010
    Greenfield Iawo
    You can keep them together, as long as he does not hurt your hens. I doubt that he will hurt your hens, but some roos are mean. I always butcher the mean ones. It will not effect the eggs as long as you put them in the refridge. My hens follow the roo around, I think he makes them feel safer. Good luck to you. lisa
     
  3. Keara

    Keara Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 24, 2009
    Vermont
    Eating fertile eggs is fine. The ones you don't want to eat are the ones a broody hen has been setting on. It is once the broody hen gives her body heat to the fertile egg that they start to develop into embryos.
     
  4. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    SW Arkansas
    There is no difference in taste or nutritional value in fertile eggs vs. non-fertile eggs and you have to look closely (and know what you are looking for) to see the difference.
    My concern would be with your hen to roo ratio. Four hens isn't usually enough to keep one roo happy, but folks do manage it. You might consider saddles for your hens if they get too much attention from the roo and start to lose their back feathers.
     
  5. bluedragon

    bluedragon Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 17, 2008
    Central Cali
    Good replies, thank you for all your help.
     

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