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Anti feather pecking devices

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by debbielou, Nov 5, 2009.

  1. debbielou

    debbielou New Egg

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    Hi

    We have a problem with one of our hens feather pecking and have tried all sprays including Ukadex but to no avail. As a result we are very reluctantly considering more invasive methods such as anti-feather pecking rings, bumper bits or chicken spectacles. All three hens were debeaked prior to purchasing them and I wonder if the bit or the rings would pose a problem with eating for them. I have seen chicken spectacles available for the same purpose some with pins and some without and wonder if these would be a better option. I would welcome any comments and help with this matter as the situation for one of my girls is turning serious. Thanks
     
  2. faykokoWV

    faykokoWV Mrs Fancy Plants

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  3. raroo

    raroo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Is she getting enough protein? More often than not, aside from stress and over crowding, feather picking is caused by insufficient protein. Too much scratch, corn, or table scraps can cause this.
     
  4. debbielou

    debbielou New Egg

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    They have a roomy coop about 9ft by 3ft and the roosting part is 3ft by 3ft and a large run about 3 times the size of the coop (there's just 3 of them). They have layers mash with bokashi as their staple food - they won't eat pellets. As an extra we give them layers crumbs and mixed corn. They have grit and oyster shell always available. They have a a pecking block inside the coop and another in the run. They also received broccoli and cabbage hung inside the coop and another hanging form the plum tree outside. We've also added orego stim smallholder as a general tonic to their water which is changed daily. They really seem happy enough and they all lay on a daily basis. The one that is doing the feather plucking seems to do it out of habit and doesn't appear to be doing it agressively but she has left one of the hens with a bald bottom and we're afraid of what's going to happen if she draws blood.

    I'v seen some pinless peepers for sale on the internet but I can't locate a seller in the UK - does anyone know where I could get some of these in the UK as they don't seem as invasive as the ones with pins.

    Thanks in anticipation for your help and advice
     
  5. raroo

    raroo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They certainly sound like they are living in a nice environment. [​IMG] Given that they were debeaked prior to your purchasing them, did they come from a crowded commercial type environment? That could be where she picked up the feather picking habit.
     
  6. DWV2528

    DWV2528 New Egg

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    they get alittle bored so try hanging a head of cabbage in their pen up off the ground enough so they will have to jump to reach it the love the cabbage and it also keep them busy:D
     
  7. farmin'chick

    farmin'chick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Try adding a high protein dry cat food for a week or so -- or some Sporting Bird (non-medicated) which has 21-28% protein. That will help you figure out if it's a protein problem.
     
  8. sben451

    sben451 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I had a couple of young roos who developed a feather picking habit a few months ago. I ordered the pinless peepers from eggcartons.com and they worked like a charm for the two feather pickers. They were not hard at all to put on the roos. I didn't even buy the special pliers, just warmed the peeper in my hand for a few minutes and while DH held the perpetrator, I flexed the peeper open and hooked it on the roo's beak. Also, make sure your flock is not crowded and has plenty of protein in the feed. With the peepers on my two roos could still eat, drink, move around normally without any problems.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2009
  9. PrimroseMom1

    PrimroseMom1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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