Antibiotic question for a bad wound infection

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by BarkerChickens, Nov 19, 2009.

  1. BarkerChickens

    BarkerChickens Microbrewing Chickenologist

    Nov 25, 2007
    High Desert, CA
    I've dealt with my share of wounds, but they are usually caught early and infection is a rarity. However, this morning I went out to check on the chickens and get eggs. One of my hens had a few feathers missing on her neck (mating) and I grabbed her to check to make sure if was minor (it is! [​IMG] ). However, I felt something slimy on her leg. My mind first though poo, but it smelled different and it couldn't be blood since blood is usually sticky, not slimy. So, as expected, I found an infected wound on the front of her thigh. An odd place and it is a puncture wound, so I suspect she got herself tangled up in something (who knows what! A loose wire in the fencing?). Anyway, I brought her in and cleaned the wound as best as I could. It smells SO nasty! [​IMG] After an hour or more of cleaning and flushing the wound, I packed it with neosporin. She, of course, is in the house now and she is on Aureomycin (chlorotetracycline), a broad-spectrum antibiotic.

    My question is related to the antibiotic though. There is so much talk about antibiotic-resistant bacteria and I know that Aureomycin in not the strongest antibiotic out there. So, how many days does it take before being able to tell if the bacteria is resistant? She currently acts as if nothing is wrong (though the infection is bad enough to stink up the kitchen and living room area!), but I know that infections can quickly take a turn for the worse. I'd rather be prepared and have the Aureomycin work, then be unprepared and lose her because she has a resistant strain.

    Thanks so much!!
     
  2. robin416

    robin416 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 6, 2007
    I would use PennG injectable for the type of wound she has. It is much more likely to cover the whole system and arrive at its fullest strength. You can make certain she is getting a full dose since you would be in control.

    With the type of wound she has she would have to be on a full 14 day course and that might not be enough to clear it.

    With the obvious infection and possible necrotic tissue you need to hit it hard to knock the infection back, I'm afraid oral auromycin is not enough.
     
  3. BarkerChickens

    BarkerChickens Microbrewing Chickenologist

    Nov 25, 2007
    High Desert, CA
    I am not familiar with PennG. By injectable, I am assuming you mean syringe right? Is this usually available at Vet supplies or is there a place online to order it from? Luckily her wound wasn't green (yet), but it sure was a nice rancid yellow. With teazers, I pulled out the infected tissue that was loose and flushed it repeatedly to bring more dead and/or infected tissue to the surface. I agree that the Aureomycin is likely not strong enough (or at least it is my concern).
     
  4. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

  5. Sammimom

    Sammimom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 29, 2009
    Sammamish,WA
    If it's a puncture wound, Pen-G is the better bet. The wound should start looking MUCH better after three days or I would re-evaluate whatever treatment option you use.
     
  6. BarkerChickens

    BarkerChickens Microbrewing Chickenologist

    Nov 25, 2007
    High Desert, CA
    Thanks for the link, Kathy!

    This evening it was oozing and pretty darn nasty. She still acts normal, but the wound itself is gross. I will call around tomorrow and see if anyone in my area carries Pen G and the corresponding needle. I am sure Vet supply will, but I'll call first to make sure. I will repack her wound with neosporin as well until it heals up.
     
  7. BarkerChickens

    BarkerChickens Microbrewing Chickenologist

    Nov 25, 2007
    High Desert, CA
    Her wound is filled inside with what looks like yellow tissue. This is from the infection, not healing, right? I don't remember seeing this before in other wounds I have treated. I need to pull all the out, right? Vet supply has Pen G, so I am getting that today.
     
  8. mypicklebird

    mypicklebird Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 8, 2008
    Sonoma Co, CA
    Yellow material could be pus, or you could be looking at normal chicken FAT. Caseous pus is crumbly- kind of like cheese. Chicken fat is well- fatty. It is slimy between the fingers. Some chickens have white fat, some more yellow. Can you post a photo? Pus needs to come out, healthy fat gets to stay there....
     
  9. robin416

    robin416 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 6, 2007
    I don't think its pus you're looking at. First it was an open wound so drainage happened keeping the white blood cells from encapsulating the infection and causing the harder, cheesy mass. I would get a large syringe without the needle, fill that with sterile saline (that can be had in the live stock section) and thoroughly irrigate the wound. Stick the end of it in the wound itself and drench it. Dry it with some sterile gauze and take a close look.

    Actually lets back up a moment, you already packed it with ointment, that could cause a problem for flushing with the saline. Try to get as much of that off first, then flush.
     
  10. BarkerChickens

    BarkerChickens Microbrewing Chickenologist

    Nov 25, 2007
    High Desert, CA
    It is definitely not fat, nor it is necessarily cheesy. If I pull it out it is firmly attached, yet breaks into pieces easily. A firm cheese of anything. I pulled some out, but not all of it. The neosporin was put in the puncture wound hours before, so it wasn't gunked inside. I gave her a shot of Pen G, flushed it with dilute iodine and repacked it with neosporin. I am crossing my fingers that we'll see a big improvement over the next day or two now that she has Pen G in her. It is swollen deeper in the puncture wound....where I can't get to very easily. I gave her the shot into the breast above that leg.
     

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