Antibiotics and eating eggs

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ChooksinIowa, Nov 28, 2008.

  1. ChooksinIowa

    ChooksinIowa Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 14, 2008
    Van Meter, Iowa
    So I have a few chickens with mild respiratory symptoms - wheezing and some nasal discharge. I would like to isolate them and administer antibiotics. I don't usually use antibiotics but when they are sick, I make exceptions.

    I have terramycin soluble and LA200 injectable. I'm trying to figure out whether I can use the terramycin soluble first and see how they do. Previously I had a chicken with this problem and I took it to the vet and he gave me streptomycin liquid for oral dosing and the chicken was well in a few days. I can't find streptomycin from my usual online poultry suppliers so I thought I might try the terramycin.

    So, I guess I have 3 questions:
    1. Does anyone know if soluble terramycin is appropriate for respiratory illness in chickens?
    2. Is the dosage 2 teaspoons per gallon?
    3. Everything I read says don't give it to chickens who lay eggs for human consumption. All my chickens lay eggs for human consumption. Is there a time period, such as 3 weeks, or a month, after which the antibiotic is gone from the system, or is it saying if I use the antibiotic I can never eat eggs from that hen ever again? I am sure it's not saying that, but nowhere can I find a "safe" period after which one can eat eggs again.

    Thanks for any help,
    Claire
     
  2. Feathered Wings

    Feathered Wings Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 9, 2008
    Georgia
    [​IMG] Don't really have and answer i think for the respitory it's good but the withdrawl i don't know. Is it in Damerows book?
    But you will be able to eat them once the withdrawl period is up [​IMG]


    I'm sorry you have this and i hope it gets better [​IMG]
     
  3. ChooksinIowa

    ChooksinIowa Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 14, 2008
    Van Meter, Iowa
    Thanks OEGBlady. [​IMG]

    It is not too bad but I don't want it to get any worse and keep spreading so I just want to nip it in the bud. I just found 1 site that said 4 days for withdrawal from eggs after last dose. I think I'll wait 2 weeks to be extra-sure. [​IMG]
     
  4. Feathered Wings

    Feathered Wings Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 9, 2008
    Georgia
    [​IMG] Sounds good sorry it's been a while since i used any antibiotics the [​IMG] old mind slips a bit [​IMG]

    Told you i wasn't going far [​IMG]
     
  5. Barnyard

    Barnyard Addicted to Quack

    Aug 5, 2007
    Southwest Georgia
    Quote:You can use the terramycin first and see what that does. I personal use Terramycin for everything and it usually does pretty good. There are alote of people on here who do not like it though.
    So I would try it myself and see what it does.


    I have been told 1 tablespoon to 1 gallon of water for 10 to 14 day's. I have also been told 2 teaspoons per 1 gallon of water. I personally use the 2 teaspoons per 1 gallon of water.


    Normally you would wait 2 weeks before you starting eating the eggs again after antibiotics. If you choose to do that you can cook them and feed them back to the chickens. IMHO, I do not see why you can not still eat them. I have, and nothing Ill has come of it.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2008
  6. computerdrx

    computerdrx New Egg

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    i found this at fda website (http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary...lDrugProducts/FOIADrugSummaries/ucm064719.htm )
    zero withdrawl period also u can use on laying hens
    i used auremycin medicated crumbles 4gm 5lb bag worked great

    I. GENERAL INFORMATION

    NADA 048-761
    Sponsor: Roche Vitamins, Inc.
    Parsippany, NJ 07054
    Generic Name: Chlortetracycline Pre-mix
    Trade Name: Aureomycin; Type A Medicated Article
    Marketing Status: Over the Counter (OTC)
    Effect of Supplement: Deletion of limitations statement, "Do not feed to chickens producing eggs for human consumption" and establishment of a Tolerance for chlortetracycline in eggs.



    II. INDICATIONS FOR USE

    See below.



    III. DOSAGE

    A. DOSAGE FORM: Type A Medicated Article

    B. ROUTE OF ADMINISTRATION: Oral - For use in Type C medicated chicken feeds.

    C. RECOMMENDED DOSAGES:

    CHICKENS

    10-50 g/t Broiler/fryer chickens:
    For increased rate of weight gain and improved feed efficiency.
    100-200 g/t Control of infectious synovitis caused by Mycoplasmasynoviae susceptible to chlortetracycline. (Feed continuously for 7 to 14 days)
    200-400 g/t Control of chronic respiratory disease (CRD) and air sac infection caused by Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Escherichia coli susceptible to chlortetracycline. (Feed continuously for 7 to 14 days)
    WARNING: Zero-day withdrawal period.
    500 g/t Reduction of mortality due to Escherichiacoli infections susceptible to chlortetracycline. (Feed for 5 days)
    WARNING: Withdraw 24 hours prior to slaughter.



    IV. EFFECTIVENESS

    No further effectiveness data were required.



    V. ANIMAL SAFETY

    No further safety data were required.



    VI. HUMAN FOOD SAFETY

    A. Safe Concentrations of Total Residues

    Recently, the Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) revised the tolerances for tetracycline drugs (61 FR 67453). Based on an ADI (ADI) of 0.025 mg/kg of body weight (bw) per day, reserving 60% of the ADI for milk and eggs, unified tolerances of 2 ppm for muscle, 6 ppm for liver and 12 ppm for kidney and fat now are codified for total tetracycline residues (i.e., tetracycline, oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline). The ADI for milk and eggs is calculated as follows:

    Using the above ADI, reserving 50% of the nontissue ADI for eggs, and applying the current consumption factors, the tolerance for total tetracyclines in eggs is calculated as follow:

    While the toxicology data would support a tolerance as high as 4.5 ppm for eggs, we are unable to build a relationship between this tolerance value and the tolerances in the other edible tissues. A tolerance of 400 ppb is established for residues of chlortetracycline in the eggs of laying hens. This value is consistent with both the incurred residues seen in the eggs of treated hens and the tolerances in other tissues.

    B. Studies to Establish a Withdrawal Time

    "Aurofac 100: Determination of Chlortetracycline Residues in Eggs from Hens Fed 300ppm Chlortetracycline for Seven Consecutive Days," PE Gingher, January 20, 1989.

    Study Director: PE Gingher

    Study Location:

    American Cyanamid Company
    Agricultural Research Division
    Princeton, NJ 08540

    Twenty Hubbard White Leghorn laying hens were treated with 300 ppm CTC in the diet for seven consecutive days. Ten birds served as untreated controls. Eggs were collected from the treated birds from 0 through 12 days withdrawal and assayed microbiologically for residues of CTC. Eggs from control birds were assayed for CTC on days 0 and 5 of the withdrawal period. Eggs were assayed in order of collection until residues at two consecutive withdrawal days were less than 0.05 ppm. The study results are summarized in Table 1.

    Table 1: Mean residues (ppm) of CTC in whole eggs from laying hens treated with 300 ppm CTC in the feed for seven consecutive days.

    Withdrawal (days) Treatment Group Controls Treatment Group CTC, 300 ppm
    0 Negative* Neg.-0.040
    1 ** Neg.-0.038
    2 ** Negative
    3 ** Negative
    4 ** Negative
    5 Negative Negative

    * Negative = activity £ 0.0375 ppm ** Not assayed

    "Aureomycin Soluble Powder: Chlortetracycline Residues in Eggs from Hens Given 120ppm Chlortetracycline in Drinking Water for Seven Consecutive Days," PE Gingher, January 20, 1989.

    Study Director: PE Gingher

    Study Location:
    American Cyanamid Company
    Agricultural Research Division
    Princeton, NJ 08540

    Twenty White Leghorn laying hens were treated with 120 ppm CTC in the drinking water for seven consecutive days. Ten birds served as untreated controls. Eggs were collected from the treated birds from 0 through 12 days withdrawal and assayed microbiologically for residues of CTC. Eggs from control birds were assayed for CTC on days 0 and 5 of the withdrawal period. Eggs were assayed in order of collection until residues at two consecutive withdrawal days were less than 0.05 ppm. The study results are summarized in Table 2.

    Table 2: Mean residues (ppm) of CTC in whole eggs from laying hens treated with 120 ppm CTC in the drinking water for seven consecutive days.

    Withdrawal (days) Treatment Group Controls Treatment Group CTC, 120 ppm
    0 Negative* Neg.-0.041
    1 ** Neg.-0.041
    2 ** Negative
    3 ** Negative
    4 ** Negative
    5 Negative Negative

    * Negative = activity £ 0.0375 ppm ** Not assayed

    C. Confirming zero withdrawal for eggs

    The reported residues in the eggs of treated hens are generally low. In the feeding study, birds were dosed at 60% of the maximum labeled dose. If residues for the study are corrected to the maximum codified dose of 500 ppm, they would range from negative to 0.07 ppm. In the drinking water study, birds were dosed at 45% of the maximum labeled dose. If residues for the study are corrected to the maximum codified dose of 1000mg/gallon (263 ppm), they would range from negative to 0.09 ppm.

    The 99th percentile/95% confidence intervals were calculated for residues of chlortetracycline administered via feed and water. For feed administration, the upper confidence limit is 90 ppb for untransformed data and 95 ppb for log transformed data. For drinking water administration, the upper confidence limit is 105 ppb for untransformed data and 106 ppb for log transformed data. For both studies, residues in eggs at zero withdrawal are well below the tolerance of 400 ppb.

    D. Regulatory Analytical Methods for Residues

    The regulatory analytical method for detection of residues of the drug is a microbiological test using Bacillus cereus var mycoides (ATCC 11778). The method is found in Antibiotic Residues in Milk, Dairy Products, and Animal Tissues: Methods, Reports and Protocols, Revised October 1968, Reprinted December 1974, Nation Center for Antibiotic and Insulin Analysis, FDA, Washington, DC 20204.



    VII. AGENCY CONCLUSIONS

    This supplemental NADA satisfies the requirements of section 512 of the Act and demonstrates that AUREOMYCIN Type A Medicated Article when used under its proposed conditions of use, is safe and effective for the labeled indications. The supplemental approval provides for the use of this Type A Medicated Article in the treatment of chickens producing eggs for human consumption and the establishment of a tolerance for chlortetracycline in eggs (0.4 ppm).

    The "probably effective"finding of the NAS/NRC/DESI regarding chlortetracycline hydrochloride was published in the FEDERAL REGISTER of July 21, 1970, subsequently reviewed by FDA, resulting in the upgrade to "effective status" and was DESI-finalized and codified in the FEDERAL REGISTER on July 9, 1996.

    When NADA 48-761 was reviewed under NAS/NRC/DESI program, it was an over-the-counter product and this marketing status remains unchanged. Other Chlortetracycline Type A Medicated Articles for use in food-producing animals are also currently on the market as over-the-counter products. Therefore, the Center for Veterinary Medicine has concluded that this product should retain over-the-counter marketing status.

    Under the Center's supplemental approval policy [21 CFR 514.106(b)(2)(ix)] this is a Category II change. The approval of this change is not expected to have any adverse effect on the safety or effectiveness of this new animal drug. However, the approval did require a re-evaluation of the human food safety data in the parent application.

    Under the Generic Animal Drug and Patent Term Restoration Act of 1988, this supplemental approval for food producing animal qualifies for THREE years of marketing exclusivity beginning on the date of approval under Section 512(c)(2)(F)(iii) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act [21 U.S.C. 360b(c)(2)(F)(iii)] because the supplemental application contains reports of new human food safety studies (establishing the tolerance for eggs) essential to the approval of the application and conducted by the sponsor.



    VIII. LABELING (Attached)

    Aureomycin[​IMG] 50, 90, and 100 premix bags

    Copies of applicable labels may be obtained by writing to the:

    Food and Drug Administration
    Freedom of Information Staff (HFI-35)
    5600 Fishers Lane
    Rockville, MD 20857
    Or requests may be sent via fax to: (301) 443-1726. If there are problems sending a fax, call (301) 443-2414.


    -
     
  7. scubaforlife

    scubaforlife Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 13, 2009
    Just wondering if you guys can help me out. I have some kind of respiratory disease going around in my flock. It has killed one bird and several others are sick. I am assuming it is Micoplasma or something similar.

    What antibiotic can I use to help the sick ones, that will still allow me to eat the eggs? All of the warning labels say that you cannot eat the eggs after using them. I pasture my birds so they consume loads of chlorophyll, which detoxifies them.

    I figure that two weeks after the antibiotics are applied, is enough to run it out of their body, but that is based on conjecture.
     
  8. JohnConnor12

    JohnConnor12 New Egg

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    Aug 12, 2010
    usa
    chicken infection Dosage Packs/2 Gallons stock Solution




    Infectious synovitis caused by Mycoplasma synoviae 200-400 mg/gal 5-10







    Chronic respiratory disease (CRD) and air sac infection 400-800 mg/gal 10-20
    caused by Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Escherichia coli







    Fowl cholera caused by Pasteurella multocida 400-800 mg/gal 10-20
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2010
  9. BWKatz

    BWKatz Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 22, 2010
    Columbia,SC
    [​IMG] Great info, thanks
     
  10. laughaha

    laughaha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 5, 2010
    Ummmmmmmm, could you please explain what I'm looking at?

    I get the infection and dosage parts of the table, but I'm lost when it comes to the packs/2 gallons stock solution. Is this the number of auremycin packs/ 2 gallons stock solution (water)?

    Just heard a sneeze in with the chickens- sounded like one chicken did it twice in about half an hour. No clue who did it but with 80 odd chickens if one has something, they probably all are getting it and I want to nip it in the bud. Never dealt with a respiratory issue with mine before. Going to TSC tomorrow- do they have the auremycin and will the packs be obviously packets or will they be in a box? Which of the dosages should I use? I'm so confused...
     

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