ANTIBIOTICS AND NEVER EATING EGGS AGAIN?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by UrbanFlock, Feb 11, 2017.

  1. UrbanFlock

    UrbanFlock Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 5, 2016
    Denver
    I recently took my silkie to the vet for a foot infection. She was put on Amoxicillin, however, I had to make a choice about that as my vet told me that since there was no FDA research on how long the residue remained in the system and how it might effect the eggs, that if I gave her the antibiotic I could NEVER eat her eggs again. That she would become just a "pet". I actually had to sign a document stating I understood that decision.
    They have been the vet for our dogs/cats for years and are very reputable. It was the avian specialist at the clinic who treated our bird.
    After I left I got to thinking that I've heard when using other meds that are necessary to give birds that you don't eat their eggs during and for a period after they go off the meds, but not NEVER. As well, I was wondering about buying non-organic chicken, in general, in which birds have been given antibiotics as a matter of course to maintain their health until well....they end up in the grocery store meat section.
    We have 2 silkies so of course it's impossible to know which one is the medicated laying bird and which is not, so essentially will have to eliminate both of our egg layers if this stands true. Right now we're throwing both away since the one is still on meds.

    Anyone have anything to say about this?
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Most antibiotics and other medications are not to be used in egg layers or meat birds. But in all practicality, many people with backyard flocks do occasionally give dewormers or an antibiotic for some reason. In the study below it shows that 7 days withdrawal is good for amoxicillin. I would wait about a month and then start using the eggs again. Each drug has a usual egg withdrawal time, and usually you can find that info here by doing a search. In drugs that don't show up here,I would do some online research. With amoxicillin, it would be more important for someone with a penicillin or amoxicillin allergy to avoid thos eggs. Here is some reading:
    https://vet.osu.edu/sites/vet.osu.e...ng the treatment of backyard poultry 2015.pdf
    http://www.farad.org/publications/miscellaneous/LayingHensEggResidues.pdf







    J Egypt Public Health Assoc. 2010;85(5-6):297-316.
    Transmission of Administered Amoxicillin Drug Residues from Laying Chicken to their Commercial Eggs.

    Khattab WO1, Elderea HB, Salem EG, Gomaa NF.
    Author information


    Abstract

    BACKGROUND:


    Antimicrobial agents in food producing animals are a very important public health issue. They are routinely added to animal feed at sub-therapeutic levels for their growth promoting properties. This practice, however, carries many disadvantages, such as the stimulation of microbial resistance to antibiotics.
    AIM:


    This study was carried out to determine administered Amoxicillin residues in laying chickens and in their commercial eggs, and the effect of cooking and storage condition on Amoxicillin residues in their eggs.
    MATERIAL AND METHODS:


    A total of 50 terminal faeces were collected from laying hens in addition, a total of 215 commercial egg samples were randomly selected from the farm treated with Amoxicillin. Microbiological agar diffusion method was used.
    RESULTS:


    the withdrawal time of Amoxicillin was 7 days. Its residues were detected in both egg yolks and egg whites for 6 successive days after the last drug administration. In addition, Amoxicillin residues remained until the 7th day from drug administration in eggs stored at room temperature, and at 4°C. Amoxicillin residue was not affected after boiling eggs for 10 minutes.
    CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS:


    eggs should not be distributed to markets until the end of the drug's withdrawal period. It is also recommended to observe the withdrawal period of drugs before poultry slaughter or table egg distribution to avoid antimicrobial resistance and to inform both owners and consumers about the risks of antibiotic residues in egg contents.
    PMID:

    22054104
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2017
  3. UrbanFlock

    UrbanFlock Out Of The Brooder

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    Denver
    Thank you for your reply. I'll look at the research you linked. I'm still curious then why packaging states specifically "no antibiotics or hormones used" when buying natural chicken meat, for example.
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Well, using hormones and antibiotics in commercial chicken meat is against government regulations. But in backyard flocks, using medicines is more common, especially if your chickens suffer an infection or need to be wormed. Many people do not give medicines of any kind to their chickens, and that is probably a good thing. Some will eat the eggs after a normal withdrawal time, but then won't eat the meat. But those with pet chickens or those who cannot part with a special hen or rooster, or child's favorite, will sometimes cave and give an antibiotic or wormer ro help. Then we have ro decide for ourselves what we want to do. There are many opinions on this sort of thing, and everyone's is different.
     
  5. UrbanFlock

    UrbanFlock Out Of The Brooder

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    Denver
    So it sounds like the "antibiotics" that are given for commercial use are the same as used for backyard use, so essentially, there is nothing unique about my bird and her meds. We will not eat our birds...so the meat concept, for us, is not a problem. We have them for eggs and once they are done producing, well....they will just live a life of I guess quiet luxury? LOL. I think I'll take this information and conclude that with all meds given to birds, we'll just follow what I hear most about..... and that is we'll wait a good amount of time and then resume eating the eggs. I appreciate your insight to this. Thanks!
     

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