antibiotics in water?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by stephiepoomomma, Mar 2, 2014.

  1. stephiepoomomma

    stephiepoomomma Just Hatched

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    We're new to all of this and my mom runs a hardware/feed store and said I should put antibiotics in the chicks water. Is this true? I haven't read this anywhere. Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    No. We never, ever use anti-biotics.

    The only "med" we ever use is powdered Corid when we have an outbreak of coccidiosis. We want naturally strong and resistant birds. We don't help chicks out of shells and should a bird go down, we cull with a sharp hatchet. This makes for a strong, vibrant flock. We provide great shelter, good living conditions and great feed/water. We only wish to breed the Best of the best.

    I want nothing to do with anti-biotics and do not wish to contribute to the production of super bugs and bugs resistant to anti-biotics. That's our point of view and it works for us, as it did for our parents, grandparents and great-grandparents before us.
     
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  3. red horse ranch

    red horse ranch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree! no antibiotics will ever be in chickens that lay my eggs or that I plan to eat. I don't use medicated feed either to start my babies and I've never had a problem because of it.[​IMG]
     
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  4. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    Agreed. There is no need to use antibiotics as a preventative measure. I'm inclined to agree with Fred, regarding the use of a hatchet to deal with illness. A lot can be done to assist with a birds health short of giving them antibiotics. Pro-biotics, electrolyties, vitamins, extra protein in the diet... give the birds extra advantages this way, and you should be good to go. Antibiotics just breed resistant bacteria.
     
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  5. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Antibiotic's have their place but not as a "preventative" in chicks water. Large commercial operations may have to do so in order to control outbreaks in their huge flocks. That does not apply to the small backyard owner. Just give them fresh, clean water and, as mentioned, keep some Corid on hand in case of a coccidiosis outbreak.
     
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  6. stephiepoomomma

    stephiepoomomma Just Hatched

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    Thanks everyone! I really didn't think there was a need either. Does anyone else use raw garlic as a preventive? I went to a class and was told this was good. Sounded good since it is from the earth and not a lab!
     
  7. rancher hicks

    rancher hicks Chicken Obsessed

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    I have to agree. I don't coddle sick birds. I separate them and give them a chance to come back. I just don't have the space or time to run a chicken hospital. It's a rare thing that I lose a bird too.
     
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  8. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    I don't bother with garlic either. Some people think it's helpful, too much is not a good thing. My birds eat chicken feed, forage on my pasture, and get any healthy leftovers from the kitchen like vegetables, whole grain bread scraps etc. I give meal worms now and then as a treat. If I've got eggs coming out my ears I'll boil and chop some for the girls for a treat. Often times the simpler you keep things the better.
     
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  9. manychitlens

    manychitlens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    *Disclaimer: I don't have chickens yet. ;)

    I've been doing a lot of reading and it seems like some people do recommend garlic. It's a really powerful, natural antibiotic and antifungal. We (my husband, myself, my children) use it, so I'm on board with giving it to chickens in moderation. Just make sure it's raw, when you cook it it loses potency. :) I hope others will chime in who have used it with their experiences!
     
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  10. rancher hicks

    rancher hicks Chicken Obsessed

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    I have paper work I give to new customers. I'd get it but it's in the wife's car and it's cold out there. I had it to make copies but the UPS store went out of business.

    Anyhow here's the short of it.

    There have been petitions or what ever to get the USDA to limit or eliminate the use of antibiotics due to the problem in Newborns.

    Whats more there is concern that it is causing antibiotics prescribed by doctors to be ineffective in fighting disease. You would not be happy if your doctor prescribed a drug only to find out that it wouldn't work against your strain of Ecoli, or other infection.

    I give the paperwork to my customers so they know why I don't use them nor will I. What's more I have a friend who didn't eat eggs due to getting sick every time he did. I didn't know it and gave him and his some eggs. He tried my eggs and didn't get sick.

    Then when he ran out he bought some Egglands Best eggs and got sick. My eggs are the only eggs he can eat with out getting sick.

    This is an excerpt from an article I give to my customers.

    " In 1999, Pennsylvania pastured poultry producer Barb Gorski used a grant from the USDA’s Sustainable Ag. Research and Education program to have meat and eggs from her won birds and those of two other farmers tested for a range of nutritional factors.
    The pastured eggs were found to contain 10 percent less fat, 34 percent less cholesterol, 40 percent more vitamin A and four times as much omega - 3 fatty acids compared to the standard values reported by the USDA for commercial eggs.
    Numerous studies suggest that diets high in omaga - 3’s can help protect against heart disease, mitigate the effect of Type II diabetes and benefit the humans body’s immune responses.)
    The pastured chickens meat (with skin on) contained 21 percent less fat, 30 percent less saturated fat and 50 percent more vitamin A than the USDA standard. "


    Buy local , eat healthy,

    Rancher
     
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